Archive for the ‘all humans have innate knowledge of God's existence’ Category

A man’s physical hunger does not prove that man will get any bread; he may die of starvation on a raft in the Atlantic. But surely a man’s hunger does prove that he comes of a race which repairs its body by eating and inhabits a world where eatable substances exist

October 7, 2009

…we remain conscious of a desire which no natural happiness will satisfy. A man’s physical hunger does not prove that man will get any bread; he may die of starvation on a raft in the Atlantic. But surely a man’s hunger does prove that he comes of a race which repairs its body by eating and inhabits a world where eatable substances exist.

In the same way, though I do not believe (I wish I did) that my desire for Paradise proves that I shall enjoy it, I think it a pretty good indication that such a thing exists and that some men will. A man may love a woman and not win her; but it would be very odd if the phenomenon called “falling in love” occurred in a sexless world.

Here, then is the desire, still wandering and uncertain of its object and still largely unable to see that object in the direction where it really lies.

C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

The wish to be free of God is the deepest yearning of man. It is greater than his yearning for God

September 26, 2009

The wish to be free of God is the deepest yearning of man. It is greater than his yearning for God.

Helmu Thielicke, Nihilism, 1961, p.40

I’m not a Christian, I’m not a Buddha

September 19, 2009

I’m not a Christian, I’m not a Buddha (sic.), I just believe in God. I think there’s more to life than what we can see.

Ruud Gullit, October 1996 after death of Chelsea Vice-Chairman, Matthew Harding in a helicopter crash.

Many people admit to there being a God but without special revelation this God remains unknown.

Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing wonder

September 10, 2009

Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing wonder and awe – the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.

Immanuel Kant, Critique of Practical Reason, p.193, 259