Archive for the ‘atheism undermines morality’ Category

The masses blink and say: “We are all equal.–Man is but man, before God–we are all equal.” Before God! But now this God has died

December 16, 2009

The masses blink and say: “We are all equal.–Man is but man, before God–we are all equal.” Before God! But now this God has died.

Friedrich Nietzsche

If God is dead so is His Law.

all these pale atheists, anti-Christians, immoralists, nihilists, these sceptics, … cannot see for themselves . . . They are not free spirits – not by any stretch – for they still believe in the truth.

November 14, 2009

all these pale atheists, anti-Christians, immoralists, nihilists, these sceptics, … cannot see for themselves . . . They are not free spirits – not by any stretch – for they still believe in the truth. . .

Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals, Third Essay, 24

When God is dead, so is absolute truth. These so-called ‘new atheists’ want to maintain ‘truth’ without God. They want to buy the biggest toy in the shop without spending much money.

If only we could get rid of God, then the world would be so much better

October 11, 2009

According to the evidence released from secret archives since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, during 1937 and 1938, when the Great Terror was at its height, the security organs detained for alleged “anti-Soviet activities” 1,548,366 persons, of whom 681,692 were shot–an average of 1,000 executions a day. (For comparison, the tsarist regime between 1825 and 1910 executed for political crimes 3,922 persons.) In 1941, when Germany invaded the USSR, camps run by the Gulag, their main administrative body, held 2,350,000 inmates, or 1.4 percent of the country’s population. The slave laborers performed important economic functions, being employed on large construction projects and forced to cut timber in the far north. No one responsible for these crimes against innocent people was tried after the Soviet Union collapsed; indeed, they did not even suffer exposure or moral opprobrium but continued to lead normal lives. Censuses revealed that between 1932 and 1939 – that is, after collectivization but before World War II – the population of the Soviet Union decreased by 9 to 10 million people. This orgy of destruction defied rational explanation. Black humor told of a new prisoner arriving at a hard labor camp. Asked how long a term he had drawn, he replies, ‘Twenty-five years.’ ‘For what?’ ‘For nothing.’ ‘Impossible,’ he is told, ‘For nothing you get ten years.’

Richard Pipes, Communism: A History, New York: Modern Library, 2001, p. 66-7

There can be no source for …moral judgments except the scientist himself

October 11, 2009

The scientist can now play God in his role as wonder-worker, but can he – and should he – also play God as moral arbiter?…F. In traditional religion, morality was held to derive from God, but God was only credited with the authority to establish and enforce moral laws because He was also credited with supernatural powers of creation and destruction. Those powers have now been usurped by man, and he must take on the moral responsibility that goes with them.

Edmund Leach, “We Scientists Have the Right to Play God,” The Saturday Evening Post, November 16, 1968, p. 16

If man is the highest, is his own creator, then good and evil is decided by majority vote

September 26, 2009

If man is the highest, is his own creator, then good and evil is decided by majority vote.

William Golding, author of Lord of the Flies

Our morality is completely subordinate to the interests of the class struggle

September 11, 2009

Our morality is completely subordinate to the interests of the class struggle of the proletariat. Good is what advances the cause of the revolution.

Lenin

Lenin denied all morality that is drawn from some conception beyond man, beyond class. We say that it is a deception … a fraud

in Karl Marx, David Lyon, p.168

Hence the elimination of the Czar’s family, Trotsky, non-collectivist peasants etc.

Morality is relative when morality is human.

September 11, 2009

Morality is relative because morality is human.

David Starkey, Soul of Britain, 2000, BBC1

But how does he know morality is (of) human (origin)? His conclusion, ‘morality is relative’, follows from the premise ‘morality is human’; but this is a major claim to knowledge – ironically, an omniscient claim.

Why should one tell the truth if it’s to one’s advantage to tell a lie?

Wittgenstein, aged 8 or 9 in Wittgenstein, Ray Monk, p.3

No reason if morality is human.

I feel murder is bad, but maybe you don’t

September 11, 2009

Take any action allow’d to be vicious: Willful murder, for instance.  Examine it in all lights, and see if you can find that matter of fact, or real existence, which you call vice . . . You can never find it, till you turn your reflexion into your own breast, and find a sentiment of disapprobation, which arises in you, toward this action.   Here it is a matter of fact; but ’tis the object of feeling, not reason.

David Hume

Since there is nothing but one person’s ‘disapprobation’ and another’s approval of an action, then there is not higher standard by which to judge. I like chocolate ice-cream, you like vanilla – there isn’t a ‘right’ flavour. I don’t like murdering children, some people do. (‘Ought’ is not derived from ‘is’.)

If all I can do, as Hume is saying, is look within, then the child killer may feel justified. Ultra relativism is the end product.

There are no moral phenomena, only a moral interpretation of phenomena.

Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, 108

How to behave when one does not believe in God or reason

September 11, 2009

I am not a philosopher, because I don’t believe in reason enough to believe in a system. What interests me is knowing how we must behave, and more precisely, how to behave when one does not believe in God or reason.

Albert Camus, address to foreign students in Aix-en-Provence, in Olivier Todd, p.408

Francine, Camus’ 2nd wife (he had numerous lovers, yet was wounded when he himself ws betrayed), said to him: ‘How can you write about love when you are incapable of it? ibid.,p.405

Why should I ask God to make me good when I want to be naughty?

September 10, 2009

Probably upon no subject ever discussed through the length and breadth of the globe has there been expended a fiercer hubbub of words than upon this— the foundations of morality. ‘Why should I ask God to make me good when I want to be naughty?” asked the little girl. All the wise men of the world are put to silence by this childish query. A parliament of philosophers will not resolve it. When we set out in search of an answer we are, like the rebel angels in Milton’s Pandemonium, in wand’ring mazes lost.

W. Macneile Dixon,  The Human Situation