Archive for the ‘secular faith’ Category

All human beings are equal, but all cultures and religions are not

April 11, 2013

All human beings are equal, but all cultures and religions are not.

Aayan Hirsi Ali, Nomad, Simon & Schuster, 2010, p.212

But how does Aayan grant such a status to all peoples regardless of achievement, talents and wealth? And from what vantage point can she declare de haut en bas that some societies are morally superior to others? What grounds her secular faith?

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there is nothing that cannot be understood, that there is nothing that cannot be explained, and that everything is extraordinarily simple

October 11, 2009

The (atheist) scientist, Peter Atkins, in his book ‘The Creation’, claims that, ‘there is nothing that cannot be understood, that there is nothing that cannot be explained, and that everything is extraordinarily simple.’

His assertion is, in reality, a faith, a belief that the simplicity we require really is in the world. Why should the world be simple? Who made that decision? Who imposed it? There is no answer, for nowhere can we find any such guarantee. The leap from effectiveness to truth is a leap of faith. The reality of Atkins’ assertion is that it is a statement of this faith. And its passion arises from the way his faith has been tested by the revelations of 20th C. science, most vividly of quantum and chaos theory. For these revelations are, at heart, revelations of complexity.

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There is more wisdom in Locke’s observation:

We cannot fathom the mystery of a single flower. Nor is it intended that we should.

John Locke

It is science alone that can solve the problems of hunger and poverty, of insanitation and illiteracy, of superstition and deadening of custom and tradition, of vast resources running to waste, or a rich country inhabited by starving poor

October 5, 2009

It is science alone that can solve the problems of hunger and poverty, of insanitation and illiteracy, of superstition and deadening of custom and tradition, of vast resources running to waste, or a rich country inhabited by starving poor… Who indeed could afford to ignore science today? At every turn we have to seek its aid… The future belongs to science and those who make friends with science.”

Jawaharlal Nehru (Indian Prime Minister. 18891964) in Bryan Appleyard, Understanding the Present, p.4

That’s faith! That’s science as panacea.

Humanism is the belief that man shapes his own destiny. It is a nontheistic religion, a way of life

September 28, 2009

Humanism is the belief that man shapes his own destiny. It is a constructive philosophy, a nontheistic religion, a way of life.

American Humanist Association, promotional brochure.

NB It is a faith (note the word ‘belief’) and the faith that claims man ‘determines his own destiny’ is no more evident to the five senses that the immutability of the Triune God.

philosophies which claim to be based upon reason alone turn out to be elaborate rationalizations which conceal the initial act of faith upon which they are based

September 26, 2009

Every philosopher who attempts to build a metaphysic is ultimately dependent upon some ‘faith principle’…even those philosophies which claim to be based upon reason alone without any admixture of faith, always turn out upon examination to be elaborate rationalizations which conceal the initial act of faith upon which they are based. Reason cannot walk by its own light, and must seek the illumination of some principle of interpretation which reason itself does not contain. The general paralysis of metaphysical speculation in an age like our own in which philosophers are reluctant to believe in anything at all or to make any kind of venture of faith is the unwitting endorsement on the part of modern skepticism itself of the truth of the Christian view that reason is blind until faith takes it by the hand.

Alan Richardson?

Atheism, Blind Faith and Empiricism

July 25, 2009

Some say God is living there [in space]. I was looking around very attentively, but I did not see anyone there. I did not detect either angels or gods….I don’t believe in God. I believe in man – his strength, his possibilities, his reason.

Gherman Titov, Soviet cosmonaut, in The Seattle Daily Times, May 7, 1962
Since the God of the Bible has declared himself to be non-corporeal, it is folly to disprove His existence using sight or other methods of (empirical/scientific) ‘detection’.
This is a case of Naturalistic presuppositions blinding those who think they see. Can we use the same empirical methods and prove man is worth believing in, has reason that can be trusted and possibilities worth pursuing? No. That’s what blind faith is for.

Evolution as a Faith

June 13, 2009

‘The general preference that so many of us hold for gradualism is a metaphysical stance embedded in the modern history of Western cultures: it is not a high-order empirical observation, induced from the objective study of nature.’

Stephen Jay Gould and Niles Eldredge, ‘Punctuated Equilibria: The Tempo and Mode of Evolution Reconsidered,’ in Paleobiology 3 (1977), 145.

Which is a high-falutin way of saying this: We like evolution not because we see it happening but because we choose it as our faith commitment.

Perhaps the explanation is found here (as given by an evolutionist):

‘Evolution itself is accepted by zoologists not because it has been observed to occur or . . . can be proved by logically coherent evidence to be true, but because the only alternative, special creation, is clearly incredible.’

D.M.S. Watson

Quoted in Herbert Schlossberg, Idols for Destruction: Christian Faith and Its Confrontation with American Society (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, [1983] 1993), 144-145.

Secular Faith

January 13, 2009

In the same way that evolutionists await the eventual discovery of “missing links” or
“transitional forms,” neuroscientists await emerging discoveries of neurobiology, biochemistry,
physics, cognitive science, and computer science to prove that human consciousness is
nothing but matter in motion. This faithful and expectant waiting is really “a form of mysticism not
religious mysticism but materialist mysticism; it reflects on unlimited faith in the power of
the materialist approach to understanding man. Almy, How Christian is Christian Counseling?,
p. 126.