Archive for the ‘suppression of the truth of God’ Category

God doesn’t exist—the bastard!

September 13, 2011

God doesn’t exist—the bastard!

Samuel Beckett

This is the suppression of truth in unrighteousness (Romans 1). Atheism is not the consequence of a logical syllogism. It is believed for other reasons. The heart, as Pascal said, has its reasons of which reason knows nothing.

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People prefer comforting lies than harsh truth

April 24, 2011

But on 3 September 1941 a Jewish woman arrived in the city, bandaged, barefoot, and with dishevelled hair. Her name was Sonia. In the street she spoke to a Jewish doctor, Meir Mark Dvorjetsky – she had come she said from Ponary. No, it was not a labour camp, and then she told the doctor her story:     Corpses at  Rainiai  “She and her two children had been among the Jews seized, imprisoned and then taken out of the city on 31 August – how they were brought to Ponary, how Jews were trying to reckon with their own consciences, how they were trying to confess their sins before death, how she had heard shots and saw blood and fell.”      As the doctor later recalled:     She was among the corpses up to sunset and then she heard the wild shoutings of those who carried out the murder. She somehow or other managed to get out of the heaps of corpses, she got to the barbed wire entanglements – she managed to cross them and she found a common Polish peasant woman who bandaged her wounds, gave her flowers and said, “Run away from here, but carry flowers as if you were a common peasant, so that they shouldn’t recognise that you are a Jewess.”     And then she came to me. She un-wrapped the bandage and I saw the wound. I saw the hole from the bullet and in the hole there were ants creeping. Dvorjetsky hurried to a gathering of Vilna Jews to tell them the story. “This is not a labour camp where you’re going to be sent to, he said. “This is something else.”     But they could not believe him – “You are the one who is a panic monger,” they replied. “Instead of encouraging us, instead of consoling us, you are telling us cock-and-bull stories about extermination. How is it possible that the Jews will be simply taken and shot.”

Martin Gilbert, Holocaust, pp.193-4

I can’t justify it, but it was a deep and sincere prayer – a prayer for strength to subdue my instincts

October 13, 2009

Despite being a critic of religion,  Bertrand Russell’s biographer, Ray Monk, writes that he once prayed on his knees to God in the San Zeno Maggiore, Verona. He was struggling to control his sexual passions. Russell wrote:

I can’t justify it, but it was a deep and sincere prayer – a prayer for strength to subdue my instincts.

Clearly his rationalism wasn’t of much help at that time.

There must be something more important, one feels, though I don’t believe there is

October 13, 2009

Writing to Ottoline from prison, in 1918, (his punishment for his anti-war activity) Russell explained that one of his most important motivations in his work and life was “the quest for something elusive, and yet omnipresent, and at once subtle and infinite: one seeks it in music, and the sea, and sunsets…But if one lets oneself imagine one has found it, some cruel irony is sure to come and show one that it is not really found. The outcome is that one is a ghost, floating through the world without any real contact…There must be something more important, one feels, though I don’t believe there is.

Bertrand Russell, in Bertrand Russell: The Spirit of Solitude, vol.1, Ray Monk, p.530

Or rather, he didn’t want a God who might tell him to leave a married woman alone (Ottoline) and be sexually faithful.

Turbulent, restless, inwardly raging – I shall always be – hungry for your God and blaspheming him. I could pour forth a flood of worship – the longing for religion is at times almost unbearably strong

October 7, 2009

I long to have the inward poise that you have,'( Bertrand Russell said to Lady Ottoline Morrell, his lover and a believer in God) but that is not for me. I shall never have it while I am alive. Turbulent, restless, inwardly raging – I shall always be – hungry for your God and blaspheming him. I could pour forth a flood of worship – the longing for religion is at times almost unbearably strong.

Bertrand Russell, in Ray Monk,Bertrand Russell: Spirit of Solitude, p.243

The fallen duplicity of man is that he simultaneously seeks after God his Maker and flees from God his Judge

October 7, 2009

…religious activity…gives us the illusion of having met and satisfied (God). (Man’s) religiosity is a subtle escape from the God he is afraid and ashamed to meet. The fallen duplicity of man is that he simultaneously seeks after God his Maker and flees from God his Judge.

Christopher J. H. Wright, “The Christian and Other Religions: The Biblical Evidence,” Themelios 9:2 (1984): 5

Anyone who says, ‘I believe in God,’ is formally correct in his statement, but the question is what does he mean by the word God?

October 7, 2009

Anyone who says, ‘I believe in God,’ is formally correct in his statement, but the question is what does he mean by the word God? The traditional view assumes that the natural man has a certain measure of correct thought content when he uses the word God. In reality the natural man’s “God” is always a finite God. It is his most effective tool for suppressing the sense of the true God that he cannot fully efface from the fibers of his heart.

Cornelius Van Til Defense Of the Faith 2o3

The wish to be free of God is the deepest yearning of man. It is greater than his yearning for God

September 26, 2009

The wish to be free of God is the deepest yearning of man. It is greater than his yearning for God.

Helmu Thielicke, Nihilism, 1961, p.40

The New god of Atheism

September 9, 2009

Prometheus’ confession ‘in a word, I hate all gods’, is its own confession, its own motto against all gods in heaven and earth who do not recognize man’s self-consciousness as the highest divinity.

Marx, from the preface to his PHD thesis,

Lyon, David. Karl Marx: A Christian Assessment of His Life & Thought. Herts: Lion, 1979. p.37

There must always be a god, an ultimate.

Running to and from God at the same time

September 8, 2009

The religious and moral life of man is man’s achievement, but also God’s wrestling with him; it manifests a receptivity to God, but at the same time an inexcusable disobedience and blindness to God…Man seeks God and at the same time flees from Him in His seeking, because his self-assertive self-centredness of will, his root- sin, always breaks through.

Hendrik Kraemer, The Christian Message, p.112