Archive for the ‘suppression of truth’ Category

Anyone who says, ‘I believe in God,’ is formally correct in his statement, but the question is what does he mean by the word God?

October 7, 2009

Anyone who says, ‘I believe in God,’ is formally correct in his statement, but the question is what does he mean by the word God? The traditional view assumes that the natural man has a certain measure of correct thought content when he uses the word God. In reality the natural man’s “God” is always a finite God. It is his most effective tool for suppressing the sense of the true God that he cannot fully efface from the fibers of his heart.

Cornelius Van Til Defense Of the Faith 2o3

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The New god of Atheism

September 9, 2009

Prometheus’ confession ‘in a word, I hate all gods’, is its own confession, its own motto against all gods in heaven and earth who do not recognize man’s self-consciousness as the highest divinity.

Marx, from the preface to his PHD thesis,

Lyon, David. Karl Marx: A Christian Assessment of His Life & Thought. Herts: Lion, 1979. p.37

There must always be a god, an ultimate.

Lying is the worst of all evils.

September 5, 2009

Lying is the worst of all evils. Everything else that is diabolical comes from it. And we have been lied to; public opinion is constantly deceived. Not a page of a newspaper is free of lies, whether it deals with political, economic, historical, social or cultural affairs. Truth is under pressure everywhere; the facts are distorted, twisted and made into their opposite.

Wilm Hosenfeld, The Pianist, by Wladyslaw Szpilman. Picador: New York. 1999, p.200

I have felt since early youth the pain of solitude

September 3, 2009

Underlying all occupations and all pleasures I have felt since early youth the pain of solitude. I have escaped it most nearly in moments of love, yet even there, on reflection, I have found that the escape depended partly upon illusion. I have known no woman to whom the claims of intellect were as absolute as they were to me, and wherever intellect intervened, I have found that the sympathy I sought in love was apt to fail. What Spinoza called ”the intellectual love of God” has seemed to me the best thing to live by, but I have not had even the somewhat abstract God that Spinoza allowed himself . . . I have loved a ghost, and in loving a ghost my inmost self has become spectral . . . my most profound feelings have remained always solitary and have found in human things no companionship. The sea, the stars, the night wind in waste places, mean more to me than even the human beings I love best, and I am conscious that human affection is to me at bottom an attempt to escape from the vain search for God.

Bertrand Russell, Ray Monk, vol.1., p.531

Myth of Objectivity – Jung on Freud

August 30, 2009

There was no mistaking the fact that Freud was emotionally involved in his sexual theory to an extraordinary degree. When he spoke of it, his tone became urgent, almost anxious, and all signs of his normally critical and skeptical manner vanished. A strange, deeply moved expression came over his face, the cause of which I was at a loss to understand. I had a strong intuition that for him sexuality was a sort of numinosum. This was confirmed by a conversation, which took place some three years later (in 1910), again in Vienna. I can still recall vividly how Freud said to me, ‘My dear Jung, promise me never to abandon the sexual theory. That is the most essential thing of all. You see, we must make a dogma of it, an unshakable bulwark.’ He said that to me with great emotion, in the tone of a father saying, ‘And promise me this one thing, my dear son, that you will go to church every Sunday.’ It is strange that Freud, who was basing his theories on and interpreting the dreams of others, including those of Jung, was curiously enough anxious to conceal his own and his private life. The motive for such concealment could hardly be academic or scientific. Jung writes, “Freud had a dream-I would not think it right to air the problem it involved. I interpreted it as best I could but added that a great deal more could be said about it if he would supply me with some additional details from his private life. Freud’s response to these words was a curious look – a look of the utmost suspicion. Then he said, ‘But I cannot risk my authority.’ At that moment he lost it altogether. That sentence burned itself into my memory; and in it the end of our relationship was already foreshadowed. Freud was placing personal authority above truth.

One thing was clear Freud, who had always made much of his irreligiosity, had now construc- ted a dogma; or rather, in the place of a jealous God, whom he had lost, he had substituted another compelling image, that of sexuality.

Jung, C.G., Memories, Dreams and Reflections, p. 150, 158

Glory to Man in the highest!

August 28, 2009

Glory to Man in the highest! For Man is the master of things.

Algernon Charles Swinburne, Hymn Of Man

Optimistic Humanism

August 28, 2009
These things shall be ! A loftier race
Than e'er the world hath known shall rise
With flame of freedom in their souls
And light of science in their eyes.

They shall be gentle, brave, and strong,
To spill no drop of blood, but dare
All that may plant man's lordship firm
On earth and fire and sea and air.

Nation with nation, land with land,
Inarmed shall live as comrades free ;
In every heart and brain shall throb
The pulse of one fraternity.

Man shall love man with heart as pure
And fervent as the young-eyed joys
Who chaunt their heavenly songs before
God's face with undiscordant noise.

New arts shall bloom of loftier mould,
And mightier music thrill the skies,
And every life shall be a song,
When all the earth is paradise.

These things -- they are no dream -- shall be
For happier men when we are gone :
Those golden days for them shall dawn,
Transcending aught we gaze upon.

J Addington Symond, Hymn (excerpt)

Symond was an advocate of pederasty, which makes stanza 4 ambiguous.

The (old?) school hymn for Tapton Secondary Modern, Sheffield was adapted from this and is as below.

These things shall be! A loftier race
Than e’er the world hath known, shall rise,
With flame of freedom in their souls
And light of science in their eyes.

They shall be simple in their homes
And splendid in their public ways,
Filling the mansions of the state
With music and with hymns of praise.

Nation with nation, land with land,
Inarmed shall live as comrades free;
In every heart and brain shall throb
The pulse of one fraternity.

New arts shall bloom of loftier mould,
And mightier music thrill the skies,
And every life shall be a song,
When all the earth is paradise.

The problem of the human heart

August 26, 2009

The problem of the human heart is the heart of the human problem.

Rico Tice

The heart is deceitful above all things,
and desperately sick;
who can understand it?

Jeremiah 17.9

Escape from Reality

August 26, 2009

Being unable to cure death, wretchedness and ignorance, men have decided, in order to be happy, not to think about such things.

Blaise Pascal