Archive for the ‘perseverance’ Category

All our conversation on the subject of religion ended in nothing. He was convinced that he was right, and all the texts I produced were, according to him, applicable only to the times of the Apostles

September 28, 2009

A certain person, though well-intentioned, tried to dissuade Henry Martyn from going to India as a missionary. Martyn remarked:

“All our conversation on the subject of religion ended in nothing. He was convinced that he was right, and all the texts I produced were, according to him, applicable only to the times of the Apostles.”

 …When called to encounter the ridicule of those who, not knowing the hope of Christ’s calling, nor the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints, nor the exceeding greatness of his power towards those who believe, despised all labors of love amongst the heathen as wild and visionary ; the Lord helped (Martyn) to keep his ground, and to bear his testimony. “With my Bible in my hand, and Christ at my right hand,” said he, “I can do all things: what though the whole world believe not, God abideth true, and my hope in him shall be steadfast.

From, John Sargent, The Life and Letters of Henry Martin, Banner of Truth, 1985, p.60

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If I had the true love of souls, I should long and labor for those around me, and afterwards for the conversion of the Heathen

September 28, 2009

I may reasonably doubt the reality of every gracious affection, they are so like the morning cloud, and transient as the early dew. If I had the true love of souls, I should long and labor for those around me, and afterwards for the conversion of the Heathen.

Henry Martyn, missionary, translator of the Bible into Hindi and New Testament into Persian. His memoir is highly recommended to inspire spiritual devotion

From, John Sargent, The Life and Letters of Henry Martin, Banner of Truth, 1985, p.31

God grant us the ‘true love of souls’ that ‘should long and labor for those around’ us.

Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence

September 15, 2009

Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan ‘Press On’ has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.

Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of US (1872 – 1933)

Give me credit for being a plodder

September 15, 2009

If anyone should think it worth his while to write my life, if he give me credit for being a plodder, he will describe me justly. Any thing beyond this will be too much. I can plod. I can persevere in any definite pursuit. To this I owe everything.

William Carey, Baptist missionary who learnt Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, French, Dutch and some Indian languages.

Tyndale suffered shipwreck and lost all his books

September 15, 2009

On ‘the coast of Holland, (Tyndale) suffered shipwreck, by the which he lost all his Books, Writings, and Copies, and so was compelled to begin all again anew, to his hinderance, and doubling of his labors.

David Daniell, William Tyndale, Yale, 1994, p.198 from Foxe, 1570 ed. between 1528-30

Yet he went on to complete his translation of the Pentateuch from March 1529- Dec. 1529

By thinking on it continually

September 15, 2009

When he was asked how he had come to make astonishing discoveries contained in the Principia Mathematica, 1687, Newton replied, ‘by thinking on it continually’.

Melvyn Bragg, On Giants’ Shoulders, p.85

Newton went on:

I keep the subject constantly before me and wait till the first dawnings open slowly, by little and little, into a full and clear light.

it’s just that I stay with problems longer

September 15, 2009

It’s not that I’m so smart , it’s just that I stay with problems longer.

Einstein

(Einstein) was remarkable for his powers of concentration and could work steadily for many hours and even days on the same problem. Some of the topics that interested him remained on his mind for decades. For relaxation he turned to music and sailing, but often his work would continue during these moments as well; he usually had a notebook in his pocket so he could jot down any idea that came to him. Elsa told how Einstein would come downstairs, strike a few notes on the piano, stop to jot something down, and then return to his study. His reputation for absentmindedness is not all myth. His wife told about how she used to bundle him up in his overcoat and leave him in the foyer, only to find him standing there half an hour later, lost in thought.

Richard P. Brennan, Heisenberg Probably Slept Here, Wiley, 1997, p.75

Plodding winds the race.

Aesop

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

Lao Tsu