Archive for the ‘Christian duty’ Category

The Law drives us to the Gospel, that we are justified, then sends us to the Law again to show us our duty now that we are justified

January 12, 2010

We cry down the Law when it comes to our justification, but we set it up when it comes to our sanctification. The Law drives us to the Gospel, that we are justified, then sends us to the Law again to show us our duty now that we are justified.

Thomas Boston, in Michael A. Robinson, God Does Exist!, Author House 2006, p.182

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If I had the true love of souls, I should long and labor for those around me, and afterwards for the conversion of the Heathen

September 28, 2009

I may reasonably doubt the reality of every gracious affection, they are so like the morning cloud, and transient as the early dew. If I had the true love of souls, I should long and labor for those around me, and afterwards for the conversion of the Heathen.

Henry Martyn, missionary, translator of the Bible into Hindi and New Testament into Persian. His memoir is highly recommended to inspire spiritual devotion

From, John Sargent, The Life and Letters of Henry Martin, Banner of Truth, 1985, p.31

God grant us the ‘true love of souls’ that ‘should long and labor for those around’ us.

I’d rather be with God against men, than with men against God

September 12, 2009

Aristides de Sousa Mendes was, in 1940, Consul General for Portugal in Bordeaux, France. He was a graduate of the University of Coimbra, a wealthy lawyer from an old aristocratic family and he had represented Portugal in diplomatic posts in Brazil, Zanzibar and the United States. Hitler’s Nazi forces had marched into Paris and a flood of humanity had departed for the south, hoping to leave France. Their destination was Bordeaux where a Portuguese visa could assure them passage through Spain into Portugal, which was nominally neutral; from there they could perhaps hope to obtain a passport or a visa to America. Salazar had ordered his embassies not to issue exit visas to Russians, Portuguese political exiles or any Jews.

Thousands of refugees reaching Bordeaux had found the Portuguese Consul General’s apartment and had congregated outside, hoping for visas de Sousa Mendes, with great compassion, decided to disobey the Salazar orders and he, with his two sons, wrote by hand some 30,000 visas in order to save as many refugees as possible from the Nazis. 10,000 of these refugees were Jews. He was quoted as saying, “I have to save these people, as many as I can. If I am disobeying orders I’d rather be with God against men, than with men against God.”

The result of this magnificent action was that he was recalled to Lisbon in disgrace, but on the way he stopped in Bayonne and wrote out more visas by hand, thus saving another thousand refugees. When he reached Lisbon he was fined and prohibited from practicing law. He was reduced to selling off all his personal possessions to procure food for his family. He died in 1954 penniless and still in disgrace.

Aristides de Sousa Mendes’ name has been honored by the United States Congress, the Government of Israel, and has been recently restored to a place of honor and respect by the President of Portugal, Mario Soares.

source

But Peter and the apostles answered, “We must obey God rather than men.” Acts 5.29

Thank God, I have done my duty

September 4, 2009

Thank God, I have done my duty. Kiss me, Hardy.

Adm. Horatio Nelson, last words, 21 Oct 1805.

Costly Service

August 31, 2009

Robert Wilson was the only surgeon remaining during the Rape of Nanking – a city of a million. Why did he stay in such perilous conditions whilst the Japanese army brutalised the citizens?

“He saw this as his duty. The Chinese were his people,” said his wife. His uncle (John Ferguson) had founded the Unversity of Nanking and he was of a family of Methodist missionaries. He had enrolled at Harvard Medical School after winning a Princeton University scholarship aged 17. He could have cherry-picked the finest of jobs in the US but he worked around the clock under bombardment, atrocities, inadequate medical equipment and supplies and Japanese Army atrocities. On the afternoon of December 13th, whilst performing a delicate eye operation a shell landed fifty yards away shattering the window and spraying the room with shrapnel. The nurses were shocked despite no one being injured. He contnued the operation, “But,” he said, “I don’t think any eyes have come out that fast.”

His home was ransacked and defiled, yet he operated for free since his patients had nothing. His family believe only his faith and love of China preserved him.

adapted from Iris Chang’s, The Rape of Nanking, pp.122-129