Archive for the ‘counting the cost’ Category

why are you not in here?

January 18, 2010

Pastor Martin Niemoller was well known for his opposition to the Nazi State.

Many times Nazi officials sat in his church to intimidate him by taking notes. Finally, they had had enough, and Niemoller was arrested. The next morning, in jail, the chaplain stopped by, who was also a Lutheran minister, and expressed surprise at seeing his friend, Martin Niemoller, behind bars. The chaplain said, ‘Brother, what did you do? Why are you in here?’ Niemoller’s response: ‘Brother, given what’s happening in our country, why are you not in here?'”

Why won’t we suffer for our saviour and stand up for truth? It is the christian at ease that is the anomoly – not the suffering Christian.

When it says ‘at the name of Jesus every knee should bow’, it means both your knees

December 19, 2009

When it says ‘at the name of Jesus every knee should bow’, it means both your knees.

Let Christians make their choice: sin or suffer

December 8, 2009

These times are like to be either very sinning or suffering times ; let Christians make their choice…sin or suffer ; and surely he that will choose the better part will choose to suffer.

The Earl of Argyll before being hanged for his faith in May 1661, quoted in Faith Cook, Fearless Pilgrim: The Life and Times of John Bunyan, Evangelical Press, 2008, p.199

Surely there’s a comfortable way our flesh prefers?

If I am out of prison today, I will preach the gospel tomorrow by the help of God

December 8, 2009

If I am out of prison today, I will preach the gospel tomorrow by the help of God.

John Bunyan in reply to the judgement of the court, which was as follows:

You must be had back again to prison, and lie there for three months following; and, at the three months’ end, if you do not submit, and go to church to hear Divine service, and leave your preaching, you must be banished the realm; and if, after such a day as shall be appointed you to be gone, you shall be found in this realm, yon must stretch by the neck for it.

Faith Cook, Fearless Pilgrim: The Life and Times of John Bunyan, Evangelical Press, 2008, pp.197-8

A few of the victims of Nazi death camps were extremely wealthy. One man had come into the camp with hat, gloves and well-cut overcoat. A few days later he was working at the crematorium refuse heap

November 17, 2009

A few of the victims of Nazi death camps were extremely wealthy. One man had come into the camp with hat, gloves and well-cut overcoat. A few days later he was working at the crematorium refuse heap. He, ‘who had looked like a diplomat, had become a dirty, lice-infested, human wreck, his spirits broken.

I saw him go over to one of the camp foremen and whisper (something). The prisoner…brought out a small leather pouch (and) shook the contents into his palm. Like a million little suns the diamonds shone and sparkled. The foreman nodded and held out three miserable uncooked potatoes, and the elderly man, shaking with impatience, tore them out of his hand and put them to his mouth.

Here, in this Stock Exchange of Hell, the value of a bag of diamonds was three uncooked potatoes. And this value was the real one. Three potatoes…prolonged life, gave strength to work and to withstand beatings. For a while, a short while, it might delight the eyes of a ruthless murderer, but when the day of reckoning came it would not save his life.

Martin Gilbert, Holocaust, p.729

What is the true value of our possessions? What is the use of acquiring the world’s goods when a man may lose his soul?