Archive for the ‘creation’ Category

We have a tri-unity in the universe composed of time, space, and matter

January 6, 2010

We have a tri-unity in the universe composed of time, space, and matter. Each aspect is comprised of its own tri-unity. In the universe these are three distinct dynamics. All three of these are also divided by three. Space is comprised of height, width and depth – a tri-unity. All is space, yet a distinct aspect of space. Matter is comprised of solid, liquid, and gas which make up a tri-unity of matter. Time is past, present, and future. Each ‘time’ is fully time. We can see God’s nature reflected in His creation.

Michael A. Robinson, God Does Exist!, Author House 2006, p.148

One cell is made up of 100,000 molecules; that 10,000 finely tuned, interrelated chemical reactions occur concurrently…a cell contains, in its nucleus, a digitally coded database larger than thirty volumes of an encyclopedia

January 5, 2010

One cell is made up of 100,000 molecules; that 10,000 finely tuned, interrelated chemical reactions occur concurrently…a cell contains, in its nucleus, a digitally coded database larger than thirty volumes of an encyclopedia.

Michael A. Robinson, God Does Exist!, Author House 2006, p.91

S.E.T.I., the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, scans the heavens for codes, information, language and patterns. They base their work on the theory that finding a radio signal with a code would prove there are intelligent beings out there in the vast reaches of the universe

January 5, 2010

S.E.T.I., the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, scans the heavens for codes, information, language and patterns. They base their work on the theory that finding a radio signal with a code would prove there are intelligent beings out there in the vast reaches of the universe. The premise is: a code presupposes a code-giver. A code-giver has intelligence…The baffling thing is to watch the scientists, who study the DNA code, fail to make the same deduction.

Michael A. Robinson, God Does Exist!, Author House 2006, p.90

We need to make a distinction between the claim that the world is out there and the claim that the truth is out there

November 14, 2009

We need to make a distinction between the claim that the world is out there and the claim that the truth is out there. To say that the world is out there, that it is not our creation, is to say, with common sense, that most things in space and time are the effects of causes which do not include human mental states. To say that truth is not out there is simply to say that where there are no sentences there is no truth, that sentences are elements of human languages, and that human languages are human creations. Truth cannot be out there–cannot exist independently of the human mind–because sentences cannot so exist, or be out there. The world is out there, but descriptions of the world are not. Only descriptions of the world can be true or false. The world on its own–unaided by the describing activities of human beings–cannot.

Richard Rorty, Contingency, Irony, Solidarity, CUP, 1989, p.5

But Rorty has assumed that language and thought can only exist in the human mind, and thus ‘truth’ only comes into being with human thinking. But God created and described the world before man existed (Genesis 1.3f. ‘And God said it was good’) and human language is a subset of God’s language (the image of God, Gen.1.26), the speaking God who spoke all things into existence Gen.1.

For who that has understanding will sup­pose that the first, and second, and third day, and the evening and the morning, ex­isted without a sun, and moon, and stars?

November 3, 2009

For who that has understanding will sup­pose that the first, and second, and third day, and the evening and the morning, ex­isted without a sun, and moon, and stars? And that the first day was, as it were, also without a sky? And who is so foolish as to suppose that God, after the manner of a husbandman, planted a paradise in Eden, towards the east, and placed in it a tree of life, visible and palpable, so that one tasting of the fruit by the bodily teeth obtained life? And again, that one was a partaker of good and evil by masticating what was taken from the tree? And if God is said to walk in the paradise in the evening, and Adam to hide himself under a tree, I do not suppose that anyone doubts that these things figuratively indi­cate certain mysteries, the history having taken place in appearance, and not literally.

Origen of Alexandria (3rd C.), De Principiis IV, 16

The debate over the literal/allegorical interpretation has been going on for a while…

The visible marks of extraordinary wisdom and power appear so plainly in all the works of the creation that a rational creature, who will but seriously reflect on them, cannot miss the discovery of Deity

October 10, 2009

The visible marks of extraordinary wisdom and power appear so plainly in all the works of the creation that a rational creature, who will but seriously reflect on them, cannot miss the discovery of Deity.

John Locke, from “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding”, 1690

So irresistible are these evidences of an intelligent and powerful Agent that, of the infinite numbers of men who have existed thro’ all time, they have believed, in the proportion of a million at least to Unit, in the hypothesis of an eternal pre-existence of a creator, rather than in that of a self-existent Universe

October 10, 2009

So irresistible are these evidences of an intelligent and powerful Agent that, of the infinite numbers of men who have existed thro’ all time, they have believed, in the proportion of a million at least to Unit, in the hypothesis of an eternal pre-existence of a creator, rather than in that of a self-existent Universe. Surely this unanimous sentiment renders this more probable than that of the few in the other hypothesis.

Letter of Thomas Jefferson: 1743-1826 to John Adams Monticello, April 11, 1823

The visible order of the universe proclaims a supreme intelligence

October 9, 2009

The visible order of the universe proclaims a supreme intelligence.

Jean Jacques Rousseau

The visible marks of extraordinary wisdom and power appear so plainly in all the works of the creation that a rational creature, who will but seriously reflect on them cannot miss the discovery of a deity.

John Locke

As a house implies a builder , a garment a weaver, and a door a carpenter, so does the existence of the Universe imply a Creator.

Marquis de Vauvenargues

It is impossible to account for the creation of the universe without the agency of a Supreme Being.

George Washington

Of what I call God, and fools call Nature.

Robert Browning

The more I study nature , the more I stand amazed at the work of the Creator.

Louis Pasteur

Science brings men nearer to God.

Louis Pasteur

(Science) came to full flower in its modern form in seventeenth-century Europe. Have you ever wondered why that’s so? After all the ancient Greeks were pretty clever..

October 5, 2009

(Science) came to full flower in its modern form in seventeenth-century Europe. Have you ever wondered why that’s so? After all the ancient Greeks were pretty clever and the Chinese achieved a sophisticated culture well before we Europeans did, yet they did not hit on science as we now understand it. Quite a lot of people have thought that the missing ingredient was provided by the Christian religion. Of course, it’s impossible to prove that so – we can’t rerun history without Christianity and see what happens – but there’s a respectable case worth considering. It runs like this.

The way Christians think about creation (and the same is true for Jews and Muslims) has four significant consequences. The first is that we expect the world to be orderly because its Creator is rational and consistent, yet God is also free to create a universe whichever way God chooses. Therefore, we can’t figure it out just by thinking what the order of nature ought to be; we’ll have to take a look and see. In other words, observation and experiment are indispensable. That’s the bit the Greeks missed. They thought you could do it all just by cogitating. Third, because the world is God’s creation, it’s worthy of study. That, perhaps, was a point that the Chinese missed as they concentrated their attention on the world of humanity at the expense of the world of nature. Fourth, because the creation is not itself divine, we can prod it and investigate it without impiety. Put all these features together, and you have the intellectual setting in which science can get going.

John Polkinghorne, Quarks, Chaos and Christianity, p.18

It’s certainly a historical fact that most of the pioneers of modern science were religious men. They may have had their difficulties with the Church (like Galileo) or been of an orthodox cast of mind (like Newton), but religion was important for them. They used to like to say that God had written two books for our instruction, the book of scripture and the book of nature. I think we need to try to decipher both books if we’re to understand what’s really happening.

Quarks, Chaos & Christianity, page 29-30.

John Polkinghorne (born October 16, 1930 in Weston-super-Mare, England) is a British particle physicist and theologian. He has written extensively on matters concerning science and faith, and was awarded the Templeton Prize in 2002.

This is the great paradox that modern science poses, that the more we know, the more mysterious the universe becomes

October 4, 2009

This is the great paradox that modern science poses, that the more we know, the more mysterious the universe becomes. For example, we have the Big Bang theory…But where did the universe come from in the first place – where did the Big Bang comes from? Where did the laws of nature, of physics come from?

John Horgan, in Melvyn Bragg, On Giants’ Shoulders, pp.341-2