Archive for the ‘cult of celebrity’ Category

Jonathan Ross’s Hypocrisy

August 26, 2011

It might come as a shock to fans of Jonathan Ross that once the studio lights are dimmed, one of the BBC’s highest-paid performers is an extremely sensitive and private person. Three years ago, Mr Ross’s solicitors wrote to Fleet Street editors, passing on their client’s dismay at having been snapped by photographers while playing tennis with David Baddiel at a private members’ club. The legal letters said that publication of these pictures would constitute a breach of Mr Ross’s “right of privacy” under the Human Rights Act 1998 and the European Convention on Human Rights.

Why should Ross find such an “invasion of privacy” offensive? Certainly the chat-show host, who recently asked David Cameron if he had ever masturbated about Margaret Thatcher, failed to see the funny side. Ross’s legal threats are deadly serious, if sometimes inadvertently hilarious, particularly in light of his recent violation of Andrew Sachs’s home and family life. The man who left messages on Sachs’s answering machine taunting the actor about how Russell Brand had “f***ed” his granddaughter — and thought it hugely entertaining to broadcast the fact on radio — zealously protects his own zone of privacy. He seems to think that when it comes to offensive and invasive public behaviour, there’s one rule for him and another for his targets.

Sunday Times

Do unto others as you please and sue them if they do unto you too

To be insensitive to the point of despising things of interest and to become insensitive to what interests us most, is absurd

November 11, 2009

To be insensitive to the point of despising things of interest and to become insensitive to what interests us most, is absurd.

Pascal

hmm – guess he wouldn’t be a fan of, ‘I’m a B-list celebrity get me out of strictly come X-Factor.’

Jesus scored only a handful of votes in a survey of heroes, it emerged yesterday. He came 123rd – tying with President George Bush – near the bottom of a list topped by David Beckham

October 3, 2009

He is worshipped as the son of God – but even that is not enough to impress young people these days. Jesus scored only a handful of votes in a survey of heroes, it emerged yesterday. He came 123rd – tying with President George Bush – near the bottom of a list topped by David Beckham.

Child abuse allegations have done nothing to dent Michael Jackson’s popularity – he came fourth, following Hollywood star Brad Pitt and singer Justin Timberlake.

Psychologists asked more than 2,500 people aged between 16 and 24 who they most admired. They could name political thinkers, artists and religious leaders but most picked sport and showbiz celebrities. Jennifer Lopez, Robbie Williams, Orlando Bloom and Britney Spears were all in the top ten. Study leader Dr Adrian North, of the University of Leicester, said: “It’s slightly depressing. What links all the names in our top ten is not their great minds but their great looks.”

THE TOP 10 HEREOES

1. David Beckham
2. Brad Pitt
3. Justin Timberlake
4. Michael Jackson
5. Jennifer Lopez
6. Robbie Williams
7. Orlando Bloom
8. Britney Spears
9. Keanu Reeves
10. Angelina Jolie

26th January 2004

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-206691/The-nations-favourite-heroes.html

Celebrity Worship Syndrome

August 30, 2009

According to the University of Leicester, 1/3 of people suffer from ‘Celebrity Worship Syndrome’.

Dr John Maltby, lecturer in psychology at the University of Leicester, has studied links between attitudes to celebrities and personality types.

He told BBC News Online that data from 3,000 people showed only around 1% demonstrated obsessional tendencies.

Ten per cent, who tended to be neurotic, tense, emotional and moody, displayed intense interest in celebrities.

Around 14% said they would make a special effort to read about their favourite celebrity and to socialise with people who shared their interest.

But he said the other 75% of the population do not take any interest in celebrities’ lives.

BBC

Faith in a False Messiah

August 17, 2009

Speaking of the terror unleashed by Stalin including his ‘Show Trials’ Montefiore explains who was to suffer: ‘Those without blind faith (in Stalin) were to die.’

In Moscow, 200,000 people, bedazzled by propaganda, massed in Red Square, despite temperatures of -27°C (at the time of the treason trial of Grigory Pyatakov and Karl Radek in January 1937), bearing banners that read, ‘The court’s verdict is (i.e. the ‘Show Trials’) is the people’s verdict. Krushchev addressed them denouncing the ‘Judas-Trotsky’, a line that strongly implied that Stalin was the metaphorical Jesus. (We know from Yury Zhdanov that he jokingly compared himself to Jesus)

“By lifting their hands against comrade Stalin they lifted them against all the best that humanity possesses. For Stalin is hope; he is expectation; he is the beacon that guides all progressive mankind. Stalin is our banner! Stalin is our will! Stalin is our victory!” The country was swept by the ‘eotional effervescence of hatred, fear and blood-lust.

Simon Sebag montefiore, Stalin, 2003, p.187

Cult of Celebrity

August 6, 2009

In his emptiness and insignificance, the man of ordinary abilities tried to warm himself in the star’s [famous person’s] reflected glow.

Christopher Lasch, The Culture of Narcissism, p.22