Archive for the ‘Judgement delayed but certain’ Category

In 1993 a Ku Klux Klansman named Henry Alexander made a confession to his wife.

April 24, 2011

In 1993 a Ku Klux Klansman named Henry Alexander made a confession to his wife. In 1957 he and several other Klansmen had pulled a black truck driver from  his cab, marched him to a deserted bridge high above a swift river, and made him jump, screaming, to his death. Alexander was charged with the crime in 1976-it took nearly twenty years to bring him to trial-pled innocent and was acquitted by a white jury. For thirty-six years he insisted on his innocence, until the day in 1993 when he confessed the truth to his wife. “I don’t even know what God has planned for me. I don’t even know how to pray for myself,” he told her. A few days later, he died.

Alexander’s wife wrote a letter of apology to the black man’s widow, a letter subsequently printed in The New York Times. “Henry lived a lie all his life,- and he made me live it too,” she wrote. For all those years she had believed her husband’s protestations of innocence. He showed no outward sign of remorse until the last days of his life, too late to attempt public restitution. Yet he could not carry the terrible secret of guilt to his grave. After thirty-six years of fierce denial, he still needed the release only forgiveness could provide.

Philip Yancey, What’s so Amazing about Grace?, p.100

A few of the victims of Nazi death camps were extremely wealthy. One man had come into the camp with hat, gloves and well-cut overcoat. A few days later he was working at the crematorium refuse heap

November 17, 2009

A few of the victims of Nazi death camps were extremely wealthy. One man had come into the camp with hat, gloves and well-cut overcoat. A few days later he was working at the crematorium refuse heap. He, ‘who had looked like a diplomat, had become a dirty, lice-infested, human wreck, his spirits broken.

I saw him go over to one of the camp foremen and whisper (something). The prisoner…brought out a small leather pouch (and) shook the contents into his palm. Like a million little suns the diamonds shone and sparkled. The foreman nodded and held out three miserable uncooked potatoes, and the elderly man, shaking with impatience, tore them out of his hand and put them to his mouth.

Here, in this Stock Exchange of Hell, the value of a bag of diamonds was three uncooked potatoes. And this value was the real one. Three potatoes…prolonged life, gave strength to work and to withstand beatings. For a while, a short while, it might delight the eyes of a ruthless murderer, but when the day of reckoning came it would not save his life.

Martin Gilbert, Holocaust, p.729

What is the true value of our possessions? What is the use of acquiring the world’s goods when a man may lose his soul?

Judgement – Your sins will find you out

August 22, 2009
A FORMER leader of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan was yesterday convicted of ordering the firebombing death of a black civil rights activist that rocked the US south in 1966. Four trials in the 1960s had ended in deadlocked juries. A FORMER leader of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan was yesterday convicted of ordering the firebombing death of a black civil rights activist that rocked the US south in 1966. Four trials in the 1960s had ended in deadlocked juries.The jury deliberated just over two hours before convicting Samuel H Bowers (73) of arson and murder in the fiery death of Vernon Dahmer. Prosecutors say he was killed for his efforts to help blacks to register to vote.

There was no immediate indication as to whether Bowers would appeal against the verdict, which carries an automatic life term.

Members of the Dahmer family, including his widow, Ellie, hugged after court was dismissed.

Earlier this week, Mrs Dahmer gave emotional testimony of how their home was set afire in the middle of the night and how her husband died in her arms hours later at a hospital.

Prosecutors say Bowers dispatched two carloads of his White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan to Dahmer’s Hattiesburg area home and business. Dahmer remained in his burning home, holding off the Klansmen while his family escaped out a back window.

The Independent, 22/8/98

The Judgement may be delayed, but it is certain.

“…behold, you have sinned against the Lord, and be sure your sin will find you out.”  Numbers 32.23