Archive for the ‘Justice of God’ Category

I don’t think God judges anybody

December 18, 2010

I don’t think God judges anybody. He loves everybody equally. I think there’s a slight difference when it comes to very evil people, but there are not too many of those in the world.

 

Sinead O’Connor

 

 

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Viewing the cross without the law is like trying to assemble a jigsaw puzzle in thin air

January 12, 2010

The first message of the cross is not God loves you, but God’s law has been broken. Viewing the cross without the law is like trying to assemble a jigsaw puzzle in thin air…the spirit of the cross is eternal love, but the base of the cross is eternal justice.

Ernest C. Reisinger, The Law and the Gospel, 1997, P&R, p.158 in Michael A. Robinson, God Does Exist!, Author House 2006, p.159

If God were not angry at injustice and deception and did not make a final end to violence—that God would not be worthy of worship

December 14, 2009

If God were not angry at injustice and deception and did not make a final end to violence—that God would not be worthy of worship…. The only means of prohibiting all recourse to violence by ourselves is to insist that violence is legitimate only it comes from God… My thesis that the practice of non-violence requires a belief in divine vengeance will be unpopular with many… in the West…. [But] it takes the quiet of a suburban home for the birth of the thesis that human non-violence [results from the belief in] God’s refusal to judge. In a sun-scorched land, soaked in the blood of the innocent, it will invariably die… [with] other pleasant captivities of the liberal mind.

Miroslav Volf, Exclusion and Embrace: A Theological Exploration of Identity, Otherness, and Reconciliation (Abingdon, 1996), pp. 303-04.

the ground of election is God’s grace, whereas the ground of reprobation is God’s justice

October 7, 2009

…the ground of election is God’s grace, whereas the ground of reprobation is God’s justice.

Wayne Grudem, Sytematic Theology, p.686

One summer day in 1937 John Griffith, controller of a railroad drawbridge across the Mississippi, took Greg, his eight-year-old son with him to work

October 3, 2009

One summer day in 1937 John Griffith, controller of a railroad drawbridge across the Mississippi, took Greg, his eight-year-old son with him to work. About noon, John raised the bridge to let some ships pass while he and Greg ate their lunch on the observation deck. At 1.07 p.m. John heard the distant whistle of the Memphis Express. He had just reached for the master lever to lower the bridge for the train, when he looked around for his son Greg. What he saw made his heart freeze. Greg had left the observation tower, slipped and fallen into the massive gears that operated the bridge. His left leg was caught in the cogs of the two main gears.

With the Memphis Express steaming closer, fear and anxiety gripped John as his mind searched for options, but there were only two. He must either sacrifice his son and spare the passengers on the Memphis Express, or sacrifice them to spare his son.

Burying his face in his left arm, John, with an anguished cry, pulled the master switch with his right hand to lower the bridge into place.

Lord knows what anguish John Griffith had to go through, whichever decision he made. But I know this: God values us enough to sacrifice his Son that we too might live.

‘For God so loved the world that He gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.’

Ian Sweeny,

Mercy

September 9, 2009

Paulina Escobar (Weaver) is a housewife married to a prominent lawyer in an unnamed South American country. One day a storm forces her husband Gerardo (Wilson) to ride home with a kind stranger. That chance encounter brings up demons from her past, as she is convinced that the stranger, Dr. Miranda (Kingsley), was part of the old fascist regime and that he tortured and raped her while she was blindfolded. Paulina takes him captive to determine the truth. Despite attempts by both her husband and Miranda to convince her that he is innocent, Paulina is certain that he is the one, and forces her husband to be Miranda’s “attorney” in the “trial” she arranges for him.

Miranda conspires with Gerardo to agree to a false confession (as Paulina states that that is all she wants in exchange for his life), so they write one up and present it to Paulina. Enraged, Paulina deems Miranda as being unrepentant, and threatens to kill him. As Gerardo tries to stop her, Miranda succeeds in getting Paulina’s gun, and threatens to kill her if he is not freed. As he advances toward the door, Paulina hits him and after a struggle gets back in control. In a last-ditch effort to save his life, Miranda implores Gerardo to call the place where he claims to have been at the time of Paulina’s rape as she leads him blindfolded out the door to the edge of the cliff. Gerardo contacts the hospital, and the story is confirmed and he races to inform Paulina, at last convinced that Miranda is innocent. However, it is revealed that the doctors at that time created alibis in order to conceal their identities, and so Paulina rejects this as false. Accepting defeat, Miranda finally tells them that he really was the doctor, that he enjoyed brutalizing Paula, and that he was sorry that the old regime fell.

Enraged, Gerardo attempts to throw Miranda from the cliff only to realize he cannot bring himself to take a life. Paulina apparently accepts the confession, and they both leave Miranda on the cliff as he stares down at the water. In the final scene, Paulina and Gerardo are at the same concert where the film began with Miranda also present, looking down with his wife and sons. They cast uncomfortable glances at each other.

Death and the Maiden

Gerardo shows the mercy that Miranda never had. Miranda deserved to be executed but did not get what he deserved.

Outward Respectability

September 6, 2009

John Wayne Gacy, besides being a businessman, Democrat party volunteer, charity worker and children’s entertainer, was also responsible for the murder and rape of 33 boys and young men.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wayne_Gacy

God never forgives sin

October 3, 2008

“God has often forgiven sinners, but He never forgives sin; and the sinner is only forgiven on the ground of Another having borne his punishment; for ‘without shedding of blood is no remission’.”

 

Pink, The Best of Arthur W. Pink, p.145.