Archive for the ‘bondage of the will’ Category

God’s freedom to save, not justification by faith, was the crucial question in the Reformation

April 3, 2010

It is wrong to suppose that the doctrine of justification by faith alone, that storm center of the Reformation, was the crucial question in the minds of such theologians as Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, Martin Bucer, and John Calvin. This doctrine was important to the Reformers because it helped to express and to safeguard their answer to another, more vital, question, namely, whether sinners are wholly helpless in their sin, and whether God is to be thought of as saving them by free, unconditional, invincible grace, not only justifying them for Christ’s sake when they come to faith, but also raising them from the death of sin by His quickening Spirit in order to bring them to faith.

Michael Haykin

We might say, then, that to assert men choose God is the pathway to Rome. It is the potter, not the clay who has freedom.

nothing good can be done if the will is wrong! Reason alone fails to justify itself

November 17, 2009

…nothing good can be done if the will is wrong! Reason alone fails to justify itself. Not without cause has the devil been called the prince of lawyers, and not by accident are Shakespeare’s villains good reasoners. If the disposition is wrong, reason increases maleficence; if it is right, reason orders and furthers the good.

Richard M. Weaver, Ideas Have Consequences


I see the better course and approve of it; I follow, alas! the worse!

October 19, 2009

I see the better course and approve of it; I follow, alas! the worse!

OVID,

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC – AD 17 or 18), known as Ovid in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet who wrote about love, seduction, and mythological transformation. As a slave to sensuality he ruined his career.

we can neither cure nor endure our vices.

Livy

men love their vices, and hate them at one and the same time.

Seneca

I was bound by the iron chain of my own will

October 19, 2009

I was bound by the iron chain of my own will. The enemy held fast my will, and had made of it a chain, and had bound me tight with it. For out of the perverse will came lust, and the service of lust ended in habit, and habit, not resisted, became necessity. By these links, as it were, forged together–which is why I called it “a chain”–a hard bondage held me in slavery.

Augustine, Confessions, VIII, 5, 10

For the law of sin is the tyranny of habit, by which the mind is drawn and held, even against its will. Yet it deserves to be so held because it so willingly falls into the habit.

Augustine, Confessions, VIII, 5,12