Archive for the ‘revelation’ Category

The fallen duplicity of man is that he simultaneously seeks after God his Maker and flees from God his Judge

October 7, 2009

…religious activity…gives us the illusion of having met and satisfied (God). (Man’s) religiosity is a subtle escape from the God he is afraid and ashamed to meet. The fallen duplicity of man is that he simultaneously seeks after God his Maker and flees from God his Judge.

Christopher J. H. Wright, “The Christian and Other Religions: The Biblical Evidence,” Themelios 9:2 (1984): 5

Advertisements

Yet there is, as the eminent pagan says, no nation so barbarous, no people so savage, that they have not a deep-seated conviction that there is a God

October 7, 2009

Yet there is, as the eminent pagan says, no nation so barbarous, no people so savage, that they have not a deep-seated conviction that there is a God…There is within the human mind, and by natural instinct, an awareness of divinity.

Calvin, Inst. 1:43-44

For what nation or what tribe of men is there but possesses untaught some ‘preconception’ of the gods?

Cicero, De Natura Deorum I. xvi.43

The inextinguishable instinct of humanity craves for a voice of revelation to solve the mystery of life and death

October 3, 2009

The inextinguishable instinct of humanity craves for a voice of revelation to solve the mystery of life and death.

Virgil

(we sail a vast sea of darkness and doubt on our ‘raft’ of understanding) not without risk, as I admit, if (one) cannot find some word of God which will more surely and safely carry him’

Plato, Phaedo

here is not one thing whatsoever more plain and manifest, and more demonstrable, than the being of a God. It is manifest in ourselves, in our own bodies and souls, and in every thing about us wherever we turn our eye, whether to heaven, or to the earth

October 3, 2009

…here is not one thing whatsoever more plain and manifest, and more demonstrable, than the being of a God. It is manifest in ourselves, in our own bodies and souls, and in every thing about us wherever we turn our eye, whether to heaven, or to the earth.

Jonathan Edwards, Works 2.252.

In his sermon on Rom 1:20, Edwards says that every blade of grass gives overwhelming testimony to the divine being. Elsewhere Edwards affirms,

Indeed, we every moment see the same proof of a God as we should have seen if we had seen [him] create the world at first.

Edwards, “Miscellanies #125,” 76 – source

Man is reckoned to be higher than the animals by virtue of the fact that he is capable of speech. Yet for many, ‘god’ is unknown and unknowable – a being who has not seen fit to make his will clearly known. And yet I, a mere man,unlike this ‘god’, am capable of expressing my character and intentions

October 3, 2009

Man is reckoned to be higher than the animals by virtue of the fact that he is capable of speech. Yet for many, ‘god’ is unknown and unknowable – a being who has not seen fit to make his will clearly known. And yet I, a mere man, unlike this ‘god’, am capable of expressing my character and intentions.

Therefore, I am greater than this ‘god’ in regard to speech and self- revelation. Others may, but I cannot worship such a being. He is unworthy of man’s adoration being a dumb idol.

It will be no excuse to an idle and untoward servant, one who would not attend his business by candlelight, to plead that he had not bright sunshine

September 24, 2009

It will be no excuse to an idle and untoward servant, one who would not attend his business by candlelight, to plead that he had not bright sunshine. The candle, that is set up in us, shines bright enough for our purposes…If we will disbelieve everything, because we cannot certainly know all things, we shall do muchwhat as wisely as he who would not use his legs, but sit still and perish, because he had no wings to fly.

John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Introduction, 5

Whilst the light of nature does not give us all truth, yet it is sufficient to make to us our duty to others and God.

“For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse.” Romans. 1.20

I’m not a Christian, I’m not a Buddha

September 19, 2009

I’m not a Christian, I’m not a Buddha (sic.), I just believe in God. I think there’s more to life than what we can see.

Ruud Gullit, October 1996 after death of Chelsea Vice-Chairman, Matthew Harding in a helicopter crash.

Many people admit to there being a God but without special revelation this God remains unknown.

Postmodern hypocrisy

September 16, 2009

Postmoderns denounce the pretence of those who claim to view the world from a transcendent vantage point from which we are able to speak imperiously to and on behalf of all humankind. Postmoderns have replaced this Enlightenment ideal with the belief that all claims to truth — and ultimately even truth itself — are socially conditioned.

Stanley Grenz, A Primer On Postmodernism, p. 38

Postmoderns are right on to decry the hubris of Rationalism. But postmoderns hypocritically won’t apply this to themselves and allow a ‘special case’ for their ‘transcendent vantage point’ from which they claim all truth claims are ‘socially conditioned’ – an implicit claim to omniscience.

We can say only how things currently seem to us from our point of view

September 15, 2009

There isn’t any pure or quite neutral experience or knowledge of reality. In order to have any experience or knowledge at all, you must have a practical slant, an interest, an angle or a perspective which…makes certain things stand out and become noticeable…There are indefinitely many such perspectives or angles upon the world – and they are all of them historically occasioned, human and contingent…even the most advanced scientific theories are …subject to future revision…We can say only how things currently seem to us from our point of view; we cannot say how they are absolutely.

Don Cupitt, Ant Realist Faith, p.2

Of course, Cupitt’s theory is itself open to ‘future revision’ when it may be seen to be just one perspective that can be as dismissed as the merely ‘historically occasioned, human and contingent’ theory it clearly is. If only he had listened to the One who knows rather more than all of us.

The need for incarnation

September 9, 2009

I don’t know if this world has a meaning which escapes me, but I know that I don’t know this meaning and that for the moment, it’s imossible for me to know it. What can a meaning outside of my condition mean for me? I can only understand it in human terms.

Albert Camus, in Olivier Todd, p.156

All revelation from God is a condescension to human limitations. When the Ten Commandments were written, they were written in an intelligible, human language. the supreme condescending revelation is the ‘Word made flesh’ (John 1.14) who dwelt among us.