Archive for the ‘eternal perspective’ Category

He did earnestly urge us, in plain and simple language, not to put off the consideration of eternal things. He did entreat us to look to Christ

February 6, 2010

‘In a little while there will be a concourse of persons in the streets. Methinks I hear someone enquiring, “What are all these people waiting for?” “Do you not know? He is to be buried to-day.” “And who is that!” “It is Spurgeon.” “What! the man that preached at the Tabernacle'” “Yes; he is to be buried to-day.” That will happen very soon; and when you see my coffin carried to the silent grave, I should like every one of you, whether converted or not, to be constrained to say, “He did earnestly urge us, in plain and simple language, not to put off the consideration of eternal things. He did entreat us to look to Christ. Now he is gone, our blood is not at his door if we perish.” God grant that you may not have to bear the bitter reproach of your own conscience! But, as I feel “the time is short,” I will stir you up so long as I am in this Tabernacle.’

Spurgeon, at the close of his sermon, on Lord’s-day evening, December 27, 1874

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The life to come is more sweet, and the death to come is more bitter

September 26, 2009

(On John Hooper’s last night before martyrdom under Bloody Mary) Sir Anthony Kingston, whom he had once offended by rebuking his sins, came to see him, and entreated him, with much affection and many tears, to consult his safety and recant. ” Consider,” he said, ” that life is sweet, and death is bitter. Life hereafter may do good.” To this the noble soldier of Christ returned the ever memorable answer :  “The life to come is more sweet, and the death to come is more bitter.” Seeing him immovable, Kingston left him with bitter tears, telling him, ” I thank God that ever I knew you, seeing God did appoint you to call me to be His child. By your good instruction, when I was before a fornicator and adulterer, God hath taught me to detest and forsake the same.” Hooper afterwards said that this interview had drawn from him more tears than he had shed throughout the seventeen months of his imprisonment.

J.C. Ryle, Five English Reformers, Banner of Truth, 1994, p.55

We’re all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars

September 15, 2009

We’re all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

Oscar Wilde, Irish dramatist, novelist & poet (1854 – 1900)

Evangelism – A Need for the Eternal Perspective

June 8, 2009

Perhaps if there were more of that intense distress for souls that leads to tears, we should more frequently see the results we desire. Sometimes it may be that while we are complaining of the hardness of the hearts of those we are seeking to benefit, the hardness of our own hearts and our feeble apprehension of the solemn reality of eternal things may be the true cause of our want of success.

James Hudson Taylor