Archive for the ‘Friedrich Nietzsche’ Category

The masses blink and say: “We are all equal.–Man is but man, before God–we are all equal.” Before God! But now this God has died

December 16, 2009

The masses blink and say: “We are all equal.–Man is but man, before God–we are all equal.” Before God! But now this God has died.

Friedrich Nietzsche

If God is dead so is His Law.

Nietzsche on Women

November 17, 2009

Two different things wanteth the true man: danger and diversion. Therefore wanteth he woman, as the most dangerous plaything…

Man shall be trained for war and woman for the procreation of the warrior. All else is folly…

…The happiness of man is, “I will.” The happiness of woman is, “He will.”…

…Thou goest to women? Do not forget thy whip!

Thus Spake Zarathustra, XVIII. Old and Young Women.

 

A man…must always think about woman as Orientals do: he must conceive of woman as a possession, as property that can be locked, as something predestined for service and achieving her perfection in that.”

Beyond Good and Evil, 238

all these pale atheists, anti-Christians, immoralists, nihilists, these sceptics, … cannot see for themselves . . . They are not free spirits – not by any stretch – for they still believe in the truth.

November 14, 2009

all these pale atheists, anti-Christians, immoralists, nihilists, these sceptics, … cannot see for themselves . . . They are not free spirits – not by any stretch – for they still believe in the truth. . .

Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals, Third Essay, 24

When God is dead, so is absolute truth. These so-called ‘new atheists’ want to maintain ‘truth’ without God. They want to buy the biggest toy in the shop without spending much money.

Sensuality often hastens the growth of love so much that the roots remain weak and are easily torn up

October 14, 2009

Sensuality often hastens the growth of love so much that the roots remain weak and are easily torn up.

Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, 120

Multiple Personality Disorder – A Consequence of Postmodernism?

October 11, 2009

The assumption of one single subject (self) is perhaps unnecessary; perhaps it is just as permissible to assume a multiplicity of subjects, whose interaction and struggle is the basis of our thought and our consciousness in general? …My hypotheses: The subject as multiplicity.

Nietzsche

With no predetermined nature given by God, man is ‘free’, chameleon-like, to change his personality at whim. But with the loss of a centre for the self, is it no wonder that some are disorientated and end up psychologically damaged?

Strictly speaking, there is no such thing as science “without any presuppositions”…a philosophy, a “faith,” must always be there first of all, so that science can acquire from it a direction, a meaning, a limit, a method, a right to exist

October 11, 2009

Strictly speaking, there is no such thing as science “without any presuppositions”…a philosophy, a “faith,” must always be there first of all, so that science can acquire from it a direction, a meaning, a limit, a method, a right to exist…It is still a metaphysical faith that underlies our faith in science—and we men of knowledge of today, we godless men and anti-metaphysicians, we, too, still derive our flame from the fire ignited by a faith millennia old, the Christian faith, which was also Plato’s, that God is truth, that truth is divine. — But what if this belief is becoming more and more unbelievable, if nothing turns out to be divine any longer unless it be error, blindness, lies—if God himself turns out to be our longest lie?”…Science itself henceforth requires justification (which is not to say that there is any such justification). Consider on this question both the earliest and most recent philosophers: they are all oblivious of how much the will to truth itself first requires justification; here there is a lacuna in every philosophy—how did this come about? Because the ascetic ideal has hitherto dominated all philosophy, because truth was posited as being, as God, as the highest court of appeal—because truth was not permitted to be a problem at all. Is this “permitted” understood?— From the moment faith in the God of the ascetic ideal is denied, a new problem arises: that of the value of truth.

Nietzsche, On the Genealogy of Morals, THIRD ESSAY: WHAT IS THE MEANING OF ASCETIC IDEALS?, 24

Nietzsche’s Perspectivalism

September 15, 2009

From now on, my philosophical gentlemen, let us protect ourselves better from the dangerous old conceptual fantasy which posits a “pure, will-less, painless, timeless subject of cognition”; let’s guard ourselves against the tentacles of such contradictory ideas as “pure reason,” “absolute spirituality,” “knowledge in itself”—those things which demand that we think of an eye which simply cannot be imagined, an eye which is to have no direction at all, in which the active and interpretative forces are supposed to stop or be absent—the very things through which seeing first becomes seeing something. Hence, these things always demand from the eye something conceptually absurd and incomprehensible. The only seeing we have is seeing from a perspective; the only knowledge we have is knowledge from a perspective; and the more emotions we allow to be expressed  in words concerning something, the more eyes, different eyes, we know how to train on the same thing, the more complete our “idea” of this thing, our “objectivity,” will be. But to eliminate the will in general, to suspend all our emotions without exception—even if we were capable of that—what would that be? Wouldn’t we call that castrating the intellect?

Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals, Third Essay, 12

This statement is the death blow to the Enlightenment and the door to relativism. Only the Christian worldview can avoid the pitfalls of both these errors. On the one hand it gives The Perspective (God’s) any and all humans lack, providing certain, absolute truth. On the other hand, this revelation is limited and requires the kind of humility Enlightenment man is incapable of, to receive it.

Nietzsche is right at least this far, man is not a pure reasoning machine as if he had no emtions or pre-commitments looking at any subject.

The impotence of their love of men keeps the Christians of today from burning us

September 12, 2009
...not their love of men but the impotence of their love of men keeps the
Christians of today from- burning us.

Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, 104

Not that Scripture would have us burn anyone – but he would have us speak of hell.

Nihilism

September 9, 2009

What does nihilism mean? That the highest values devaluate themselves. The aim is lacking; “why?” finds no answer.

Radical nihilism is the conviction of an absolute untenability of existence when it comes to the highest values one recognizes; plus the realization that we lack the least right to posit a beyond or an in‑itself of things that might be “divine” or morality incarnate. This realization is a consequence of the cultivation of “truthfulness” ‑‑thus itself a consequence of the faith in morality.

Nietzsche, (Will to Power § 3)

Suffering without purpose is unbearable

September 9, 2009

Until the advent of the ascetic ideal, man, the animal man, had no meaning at all on this earth. His existence was aimless; the question, ‘Why is there such a thing as man?’ could not have been answered….behind every great human destiny there sounded as a refrain a yet greater “in vain!” This is precisely what the ascetic ideal means: that something was lacking, that man was surrounded by a fearful void—he did not know how to justify, to account for, to affirm himself; he suffered from the problem of his meaning…

He also suffered otherwise, he was in the main a sickly animal: but his problem was not suffering itself, but that there was no answer to the crying question, “why do I suffer?”

Man, the bravest of animals and the one most accustomed to suffering, does not repudiate suffering as such; he desires it, he even seeks it out, provided he is shown a meaning for it, a purpose of suffering. The meaninglessness of suffering, not suffering itself, was the curse that lay over mankind so far…man would rather will nothingness than not will.

Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals, Third Essay, 28