Archive for the ‘God's love’ Category

Could we with ink the ocean fill

May 25, 2011
  1. The love of God is greater far
    Than tongue or pen can ever tell;
    It goes beyond the highest star,
    And reaches to the lowest hell;
    The guilty pair, bowed down with care,
    God gave His Son to win;
    His erring child He reconciled,
    And pardoned from his sin.

    • Refrain:
      Oh, love of God, how rich and pure!
      How measureless and strong!
      It shall forevermore endure—
      The saints’ and angels’ song.
  2. When hoary time shall pass away,
    And earthly thrones and kingdoms fall,
    When men who here refuse to pray,
    On rocks and hills and mountains call,
    God’s love so sure, shall still endure,
    All measureless and strong;
    Redeeming grace to Adam’s race—
    The saints’ and angels’ song.
  3. Could we with ink the ocean fill,
    And were the skies of parchment made,
    Were every stalk on earth a quill,
    And every man a scribe by trade;
    To write the love of God above
    Would drain the ocean dry;
    Nor could the scroll contain the whole,
    Though stretched from sky to sky.

The Love of God, Frederick M. Lehman

Love

April 12, 2011

Dear GOD,

I bet it is very hard for You to love all of everybody in the whole world. There are only 4 people in our family and I can never do it. -Nan.

Children’s Letters to God

Calvin: “The heavenly Father does not wish the human race that He loves to perish”

January 27, 2011

In his commentary on John 3:16, Calvin wrote, “There is no calm haven where our minds can rest until we come to God’s free love. The whole substance of our salvation is not to be sought anywhere else than in Christ, and so we must see by what means Christ flows to us and why He was offered as our Saviour. Both points are clearly told us here—that faith in Christ quickens all and that Christ brought life because the heavenly Father does not wish the human race that He loves to perish. . . . He has used a general term [whosoever], both to invite indiscriminately all to share in life and to cut off every excuse from unbelievers. Such also is the significance of the term ‘world’ which he had used before. For although there is nothing in the world deserving of God’s favour, He nevertheless shows He is favourable to the whole world when he calls all without exception to the faith of Christ, which is indeed an entry into life”

Calvin

The Trinity is the sole ground of love

January 10, 2010

The Nicene Creed – three persons, one God… Whether you realize it or not that catapulted the Nicene Creed right into our century and its discussion: three Persons in existence, loving each other, and in communication with each other, before all else was. If this was not so, we would have had a God who needed the universe as much as the universe needed God. But God did not need to create; God does not need the universe as the universe needs Him. Why? God is a full and true Trinity. The Persons of the Trinity communicated with each other before the creation of the world. This is not only an answer to the acute philosophic need of unity in diversity, but of personal unity and diversity. The unity and diversity cannot exist before God or behind God because whatever is farthest back is God… The unity and diversity are in God Himself – three persons, yet one God… this is not the best answer; it is the only answer. Nobody else, no philosophy, has ever given an answer for unity and diversity… Every philosophy has this problem, and no philosophy has an answer. Christianity does have an answer in the Trinity. The only answer to what exists is that He, the starting-place, is there.

Francis Schaeffer, quoted in Michael A. Robinson, God Does Exist!, Author House 2006, pp.154-5

A unitarian god would be a god that lacked. He could not be love in himself since he would need a creation to love. He would not be an eternally loving being. Neither would a unitarian god be an eternally communicating being. In addition, the Triune God supplies the ground for equality (such as between persons generally and the sexes in particukar) because the different roles of the divine persons in no way diminishes their equality since they are of one substance.

love and wrath are only the obverse and reverse of the same thing

November 17, 2009

It is hard for us to imagine wrath which is entirely free from the personal elements of malice
and vindictiveness, and therefore we misconstrue the wrath of God. But if we express it in other
words, His wrath is no more than the clear shining of His light, which must go forth implacably
to the destruction of all darkness. The best way to understand the doctrine of the wrath of God is
to consider the alternatives. The alternative is not love; since rightly conceived, love and wrath
are only the obverse and reverse of the same thing. The alternative to wrath is neutrality –
neutrality in the conflict of the world. To live in such a world would be a nightmare. It is only
the doctrine of the wrath of God, of His irreconcilable hostility to all evil, which makes life
tolerable in such a world as ours.’

Bishop Stephen Neill

Seeing a Japanese grenade falling in the midst of his colleagues, Osborn shouted a warning and threw himself on it as it exploded, saving at least six others at the expense of his own life

October 3, 2009

Seeing a Japanese grenade falling in the midst of his colleagues, Osborn shouted a warning and threw himself on it as it exploded, saving at least six others at the expense of his own life. After the war, when returning PoWs tell of Osborn’s deed, he is awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross, the only one of the Hong Kong defense.

Martin Gilbert, WWII, p.280 (December 18th, 1941)

Company Sergeant Major John Osborn was a World War I veteran.

One summer day in 1937 John Griffith, controller of a railroad drawbridge across the Mississippi, took Greg, his eight-year-old son with him to work

October 3, 2009

One summer day in 1937 John Griffith, controller of a railroad drawbridge across the Mississippi, took Greg, his eight-year-old son with him to work. About noon, John raised the bridge to let some ships pass while he and Greg ate their lunch on the observation deck. At 1.07 p.m. John heard the distant whistle of the Memphis Express. He had just reached for the master lever to lower the bridge for the train, when he looked around for his son Greg. What he saw made his heart freeze. Greg had left the observation tower, slipped and fallen into the massive gears that operated the bridge. His left leg was caught in the cogs of the two main gears.

With the Memphis Express steaming closer, fear and anxiety gripped John as his mind searched for options, but there were only two. He must either sacrifice his son and spare the passengers on the Memphis Express, or sacrifice them to spare his son.

Burying his face in his left arm, John, with an anguished cry, pulled the master switch with his right hand to lower the bridge into place.

Lord knows what anguish John Griffith had to go through, whichever decision he made. But I know this: God values us enough to sacrifice his Son that we too might live.

‘For God so loved the world that He gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.’

Ian Sweeny,

What drives religious pluralism?

September 17, 2009

Can we accept the conclusion that the God of love who seeks to save all mankind has nevertheless ordained that men must be saved in such a way that only a small minority can receive this salvation? It is the weight of this moral contradiction which has driven Christian thinkers in modern times to explore other ways of understanding the human religious situation.

John Hick, God and the Universe of Faiths, 1977

So it is unacceptable to John Hick – as if that determines truth – that the God of love (this is a hangover from his distinctly Christian upbringing, how does he know God is love?) save only a minority (as if God is obliged to save anyone or is unjust in his wrath against rebel sinners)?

But where is the moral contradiction? There is none, unless God is obliged to save all men (due to his ‘love’).

The experience of the love of God

September 3, 2009

What a vast difference there is between the acknowledgement of, and the experience of, the love of God!

Blaise Pascal.

C.S.Lewis on God’s love

September 3, 2009

God has paid us the intolerable compliment of loving us, in the deepest, most tragic, most inexorable sense.

C.S.Lewis, Problem of Pain, p.41, 32f.

I.e., He loves us so much he will not leave us to our own devices. Because as Lewis observes elsewhere:

Love may forgive all infirmities and love still in spite of them: but Love cannot cease to will their removal.

Love is something more stern and splendid than mere kindness.

Love is not affectionate feeling, but a steady wish for the loved person’s ultimate good as far as it can be obtained.