Archive for the ‘ideas have consequences’ Category

all the (counter-revolutionary) targets were ordered to kneel and kowtow to a huge portrait of Mao at the back of the platform

November 17, 2009

…all the (counter-revolutionary) targets were ordered to kneel and kowtow to a huge portrait of Mao at the back of the platform. While the others did as they were told, my father refused. He said that kneeling and kowtowing were undignified feudal practices which the Communists were committed to eliminating. The Rebels screamed, kicked his knees, and struck him on the head, but he struggled to stand upright. “I will not kneel! I will not kowtow!! he said furiously . . . “I have committed no crime. I will not bend my head!” . . . Several large men jumped on him to try and force him down, but as soon as they let go he stood straight up, raised his head, and stared defiantly at the audience . . . the hysterical crowd screamed that he was “anti-Cultural Revolution . . . ”

Jung Chang, Wild Swans, 1992, Flamingo, London, pp. 439–40

 

 

nothing good can be done if the will is wrong! Reason alone fails to justify itself

November 17, 2009

…nothing good can be done if the will is wrong! Reason alone fails to justify itself. Not without cause has the devil been called the prince of lawyers, and not by accident are Shakespeare’s villains good reasoners. If the disposition is wrong, reason increases maleficence; if it is right, reason orders and furthers the good.

Richard M. Weaver, Ideas Have Consequences


in Nepal widows are considered to be social pariahs who are despised, insulted and abused. It makes no difference if the husband died from natural causes or was killed fighting in a war. Their widows are cursed

November 13, 2009

For those who think Christianity has oppressed women:

You would expect a woman who has been widowed to be afforded sympathy from her family and friends at the very least. But in Nepal widows are considered to be social pariahs who are despised, insulted and abused. It makes no difference if the husband died from natural causes or was killed fighting in a war. Their widows are cursed. (In)… this disturbing situation…the women’s own family will be angry with them for being a financial burden (there’s little chance of remarrying). One man openly admits he is so irritated with his 13-year-old daughter who was widowed a year ago that he beats her and treats her as a slave. The in-laws are just as cruel, considering widows to be bad luck and holding them responsible for the death of their son. No wonder married women pray that their husbands will live a long time… one Hindu religious leader…explains that the widows are being punished for a sin in a previous life. He even suggests that the traditional practice of sati (where the wife throws herself on her husband’s funeral pyre) should be resurrected.

TV Times review of Channel 4’s Unreported World, broadcast 13/11/9

I used to wonder what on earth drove women in India to want to throw themselves on their husbands funeral pyre. But there was the carrot and the stick. The carrot was the (delusional) hope of a better reincarnation; the stick was the kind of social exclusion this programme narrates. Why, the poor widow reasoned, should I live in this body and suffer from even those closest to me, when I can perhaps achieve moksha (liberation from the cycle of existence) or at least a better go next time around? Ideas have consequences.

All life is bound up in three theses: Struggle is the father of all things, virtue lies in blood, leadership is primary and decisive

November 2, 2009

Man has become great through struggle… Whatever goal man has reached is due to his originality plus his brutality… All life is bound up in three theses… struggle is the father of all things, virtue lies in blood, leadership is primary and decisive…’The whole work of Nature is a mighty struggle between strength and weakness – an eternal victory of the strong over the weak. There would be nothing but decay in the whole of Nature if this were not so. States which offend against this elementary law fall into decay…through all the centuries force and power are the determining factors Only force rales. Force is the first law. Force was more than the decisive factor in any situation; it was
force which alone created right. ‘Always before God and the world, the stronger has the right to carry through what he wills. History proves: He who has not the strength – him the “right in itself” profits not a whit.

Adolf Hitler, Hitler:A STUDY IN TYRANNY, Alan Bullock, pp.398-9

There can be no source for …moral judgments except the scientist himself

October 11, 2009

The scientist can now play God in his role as wonder-worker, but can he – and should he – also play God as moral arbiter?…F. In traditional religion, morality was held to derive from God, but God was only credited with the authority to establish and enforce moral laws because He was also credited with supernatural powers of creation and destruction. Those powers have now been usurped by man, and he must take on the moral responsibility that goes with them.

Edmund Leach, “We Scientists Have the Right to Play God,” The Saturday Evening Post, November 16, 1968, p. 16

the philosophy in the classroom of this generation is the philosophy of government in the next

October 4, 2009

…the philosophy in the classroom of this generation is the philosophy of government in the next.

Abraham Lincoln

Other education quotes

I don’t think in goods or bads, just is’s

September 29, 2009

I don’t think in goods or bads, just is’s, What it is. Not what I was, want or hope. Whatever life is, it is, and bad and good got nothing to do with it. A snake eats the baby squirrel. Mamma squirrel may say that’s bad, but snakes got to eat. The life cycles are and only humans got the order f*****d up.

Charles Manson

Manson believed he was Jesus Christ reincarnated and even had himself strapped to a cross whilst his followers threw abuse at him or wailed in torment at his crucifixion. Manson orchestrated the murder of Roman Polanski’s wife, the actress Sharon Tate, who was heavily pregnant at the time. Others were killed that night including a couple called LaBianca. In the attack on Tate and others, they inflicted 102 stab wounds. Tex Watson, one of the lead perpetrators said, ‘I am the Devil and I am here to do the Devil’s business’.

I have been striving to attain moksha

September 21, 2009

What I want to achieve, what I have been striving and pining to achieve these thirty years, is self- realization, to see God face to face, to attain moksha.*

Gandhi

* moksha is the Hindu idea of escape/release from the wheel of rebirth/reincarnation and to attain mystical union with God/Brahman.

People are driven to act by their worldview.

The love of Mao is better

September 13, 2009

The earth is so wide, the sky is so large, the love of the party is larger than them. The love of the father and mother is good, but the love of Mao is better. Everything is good, but the best is socialism. Maoism is the treasure of the revolutionary. Anybody who opposes it is our enemy.

Harry Wu says Chinese schoolchildren learnt this, in, Troublemaker, p.53

Offering pardon for future sins

September 13, 2009

The pope needed funds to rebuild St. Peter’s Chuch in Rome. So he authorised a preacher named Tetzel to see ‘indulences’ throughout Germany. Tetzel said, ‘No sooner do the coins clink in the money chest than the souls of a loved one flies out of purgatory.’ ( Luther, Works of Martin Luther, The Philadelphia Edition, trans. C. M. Jacobs, vol. 1: Letter to the Archbishop Albrecht of Mainz (Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1982), p. 26.)

One day a young man asked Tetzel if the purchase of an indulgence could obtain pardon for any sin.  “Absolutely!” responded Tetzel.  “What if the sin hasn’t yet been committed, but is being contemplated by a person?” the man asked.  “It makes no difference,” Tetzel assured him.  “No sin is too great.”  With that, the young man eagerly purchased the indulgence.  After Tetzel had completed his rather lucrative session in that village, he packed up his wares and journeyed toward the next town.  On the way, he was confronted by a band of thieves who robbed him of all he had, including the money from that day’s sale of indulgences.  The grinning leader of the thieves was none other than the young man who had purchased an indulgence that afternoon in contemplation of a future sin – robbery.

David W. Bercot, Will The Real Heretics Please Stand Up, 3rd ed., Scroll Publishing Company, Tyler, TX, 1999, p. 144.