Archive for the ‘Jonathan Edwards’ Category

Edwards’ spiritual experiences

October 8, 2011

Sometimes, only mentioning a single word caused my heart to burn within me; or only seeing the name of Christ, or the name of some attribute of God. And God has appeared glorious to me, on account of the Trinity. It has made me have exalting thoughts of God, that he subsists in three persons; Father, Son and Holy Ghost. The sweetest joys and delights I have experienced, have not been those that have arisen from a hope of my own good estate; but in a direct view of the glorious things of the gospel. When I enjoy this sweetness, it seems to carry me above the thoughts of my own estate; it seems at such times a loss that I cannot bear, to take off my eye from the glorious, pleasant object I behold without me, to turn my eye in upon myself, and my own good estate…

Once, as I rode out into the woods for my health, in 1737, having alighted from my horse in a retired place, as my manner commonly has been, to walk for divine contemplation and prayer, I had a view that for me was extraordinary, of the glory of the Son of God, as Mediator between God and man, and his wonderful, great, full, pure and sweet grace and love, and meek and gentle condescension. This grace that appeared so calm and sweet, appeared also great above the heavens. The person of Christ appeared ineffably excellent with an excellency great enough to swallow up all thought and conception … which continued as near as I can judge, about an hour; which kept me the greater part of the time in a flood of tears, and weeping aloud. I felt an ardency of soul to be, what I know not otherwise how to express, emptied and annihilated; to lie in the dust, and to be full of Christ alone; to love him with a holy and pure love; to trust in him; to live upon him; to serve and follow him; and to be perfectly sanctified and made pure, with a divine and heavenly purity. I have, several other times, had views very much of the same nature, and which have had the same effects.

Jonathan Edwards

 

 

 

Christians in their effectual calling, are not called to idleness, but to labor in God’s vineyard, and spend their day in doing a great and laborious service

October 31, 2009

All Christ’s peculiar people do not only do good works, but are zealous of good works, (Tit 2:14) No man can do the service of two masters at once. They that are God’s true servants do give up themselves to his service, and make it as it were their whole work, therein employing their whole hearts, and the chief of their strength. (Phil 3:13) “This one thing I do.” Christians in their effectual calling, are not called to idleness, but to labor in God’s vineyard, and spend their day in doing a great and laborious service. All true Christians comply with this call (as is implied in its being an effectual call), and do the work of Christians.

Jonathan Edwards

Edwards, Jonathan (1750). A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections: In Three Parts. Part 3:XII, ppg. 6.

I had a view that for me was extraordinary, of the glory of the Son of God as Mediator between God and man, and His wonderful, great, full, pure and sweet grace and love, and meek and gentle condescension

October 7, 2009

Once, as I rode out into the woods for my health in 1737, having alighted from my horse in a retired place, as my manner commonly has been, to walk for divine contemplation and prayer, I had a view that for me was extraordinary, of the glory of the Son of God as Mediator between God and man, and His wonderful, great, full, pure and sweet grace and love, and meek and gentle condescension. This grace that appeared so calm and sweet, appeared also great above the heavens. The Person of Christ appeared ineffably excellent, with an excellency great enough to swallow up all thought and conception, which continued, as near as I can judge, about an hour, which kept me the greater part of the time in a flood of tears and weeping aloud . . . I felt an ardency of soul to be, what I know not otherwise how to express, emptied and annihilated; to lie in the dust and to be full of Christ alone; to love Him with a holy and pure love; to trust in Him; to live upon Him; to serve and follow Him and to be perfectly sanctified and made pure with a divine and heavenly purity.

Jonathan Edwards, cited by Martyn Lloyd-Jones in An Exposition of Ephesians 1, God’s Ultimate Purpose, p. 275

here is not one thing whatsoever more plain and manifest, and more demonstrable, than the being of a God. It is manifest in ourselves, in our own bodies and souls, and in every thing about us wherever we turn our eye, whether to heaven, or to the earth

October 3, 2009

…here is not one thing whatsoever more plain and manifest, and more demonstrable, than the being of a God. It is manifest in ourselves, in our own bodies and souls, and in every thing about us wherever we turn our eye, whether to heaven, or to the earth.

Jonathan Edwards, Works 2.252.

In his sermon on Rom 1:20, Edwards says that every blade of grass gives overwhelming testimony to the divine being. Elsewhere Edwards affirms,

Indeed, we every moment see the same proof of a God as we should have seen if we had seen [him] create the world at first.

Edwards, “Miscellanies #125,” 76 – source

The essence of evangelical humiliation, consists in a mean esteem of himself, as nothing, and as altogether contemptible and odious, attended with a mortification of a disposition to exalt himself, and a free renunciation of his own glory

September 28, 2009

The essence of evangelical humiliation, consists in such humility as becomes a creature under a dispensation of grace, consisting in a mean esteem of himself, as nothing, and as altogether contemptible and odious, attended with a mortification of a disposition to exalt himself, and a free renunciation of his own glory. — He that has much grace, apprehends, much more than others, that great height to which his love ought to ascend, and he sees better than others how little a way he has risen towards that height, and, therefore, estimating his love by the whole height of his duty, it appears astonishingly little and low in his eyes. —It most demonstratively appears that true grace is of that nature, that the more a person has of it, with remaining corruption, the less does his goodness and holiness appear, in proportion, not only to his past deformity, but to his present deformity, in the sin that now appears in his heart and in the abominable defects of his highest affections and brightest experience.

Jonathan Edwards

A person is said to be justified when he is approved of God as free from the guilt of sin and its deserved punishment; and as having that righteousness belonging to him that entitles to the reward of life

September 26, 2009

A person is said to be justified when he is approved of God as free from the guilt of sin and its deserved punishment; and as having that righteousness belonging to him that entitles to the reward of life.

Jonathan Edwards

(Justification is)

…a judicial act of God pardoning sinners (wicked and ungodly persons, Rom. 4:5; 3:9-24), accepting them as just, and so putting permanently right their previously estranged relationship with himself.

J.I. Packer

Justification is an instantaneous legal act of God in which he (1) thinks of our sins as forgiven and Christ’s righteousness as belonging to us, and (2) declares us to be righteous in His sight.

Wayne Grudem

HT jamespruch

A man that sets himself to reason without divine light is like a man that goes in the dark into a garden full of the most beautiful plants

September 24, 2009

Ratiocination, without·spiritual light, never will give one such an advantage to see things in their true relations and respects to other things, and to things in general. A man that sets himself to reason without divine light is like a man that goes in the dark into a garden full of the most beautiful plants, and most artfully ordered, and compares things together by going from one thing to another to feel of them all, to perceive their beauty.

Jonathan Edwards, “Miscellanies #408,” 249

Conviction of Sin

September 4, 2009

Many persons are prejudiced against all religious experience, in which high affections of joy follow great distress and terror. But such prejudices derive no encouragement either from reason or from Scripture. Surely it cannot be unreasonable, that before God delivers us from a state of sin, and liability to everlasting woe, he should give us some considerable sense of the evil from which he delivers us, in order that we may know and feel the importance of salvation, and be enabled to appreciate the value of what God is pleased to do for us. As those who are saved are successively in two extremely different states — first in a state of condemnation, and then in a state of justification and blessedness — and as God, in the salvation of men, deals with them as rational and intelligent creatures— it appears agreeable to his wisdom that those who are saved should be made sensible of their being in those two different states. In the first place, that they should be made sensible of their state of condemnation ; and afterward, of their state of deliverance and happiness: that they should be made to feel their absolute need of a Savior, and then be convinced of the sufficiency of Christ, and the perfect readiness with which God is always disposed to exercise mercy through him.

Jonathan Edwards, Treatise on Religious Affections

Humility – Jonathan Edwards

August 29, 2009

…however sensible we may be of our meanness as compared with some of our fellow creatures, we are not truly humble unless we have a sense of our nothingness as compared with God. Some have a low thought of themselves as compared with other men: from the meanness of their circumstances, or from a melancholy and desponding temperament which is natural to them, or from some other cause, while still they know nothing of the infinite distance there is between them and God…

…Humility is a most essential and distinguishing trait in all true piety. It is the attendant of every grace, and in a peculiar manner tends to the purity of Christian feeling. It is the ornament of the spirit, the source of some of the sweetest exercises of Christian experience, the most acceptable sacrifice we can offer to God, the subject of the richest of his promises, [and] the spirit with which he will dwell on earth, and which he will crown with glory in heaven hereafter. Earnestly seek, then, and diligently and prayerfully cherish, an humble spirit, and God shall walk with you here below, and when a few more days shall have passed, he will receive you to the honors bestowed on his people at Christ’s right hand.

Jonathan Edwards, The Spirit Of Charity Is An Humble Spirit

Conversion of Jonathan Edwards

August 4, 2009

Read it here