Archive for the ‘love’ Category

Love

April 12, 2011

Dear GOD,

I bet it is very hard for You to love all of everybody in the whole world. There are only 4 people in our family and I can never do it. -Nan.

Children’s Letters to God

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Love is but its outgoing; sin is but its defiance; grace is but its action on sin; the Cross is but its victory; faith is but its worship

January 26, 2010

Holiness cannot be separated from love. “Love” says P.T. Forsyth, “is but its (holiness’) outgoing; sin is but its defiance; grace is but its action on sin; the Cross is but its victory; faith is but its worship.”

David F. Wells, The Courage to be Protestant, IVP, 2008, p.241

The Trinity is the sole ground of love

January 10, 2010

The Nicene Creed – three persons, one God… Whether you realize it or not that catapulted the Nicene Creed right into our century and its discussion: three Persons in existence, loving each other, and in communication with each other, before all else was. If this was not so, we would have had a God who needed the universe as much as the universe needed God. But God did not need to create; God does not need the universe as the universe needs Him. Why? God is a full and true Trinity. The Persons of the Trinity communicated with each other before the creation of the world. This is not only an answer to the acute philosophic need of unity in diversity, but of personal unity and diversity. The unity and diversity cannot exist before God or behind God because whatever is farthest back is God… The unity and diversity are in God Himself – three persons, yet one God… this is not the best answer; it is the only answer. Nobody else, no philosophy, has ever given an answer for unity and diversity… Every philosophy has this problem, and no philosophy has an answer. Christianity does have an answer in the Trinity. The only answer to what exists is that He, the starting-place, is there.

Francis Schaeffer, quoted in Michael A. Robinson, God Does Exist!, Author House 2006, pp.154-5

A unitarian god would be a god that lacked. He could not be love in himself since he would need a creation to love. He would not be an eternally loving being. Neither would a unitarian god be an eternally communicating being. In addition, the Triune God supplies the ground for equality (such as between persons generally and the sexes in particukar) because the different roles of the divine persons in no way diminishes their equality since they are of one substance.

Russell’s life seems to have been inexorably drawn towards disaster, determined on its course by two fundamental traits of character: a deep-seated fear of madness and a quite colossal vanity

November 15, 2009

Ray Monk spent more than 10 years on his two volume biography of Bertrand Russell. He comments:

Another reason – perhaps the main one – that this has been a difficult book to write has been my growing realisation of the tragedy of Russell’s life . . .I do not just mean that there was sadness in Russell’s life, though, to be sure, the degree of suffering he endured – and caused – has been one of the hardest revelations of my work on this book…what I mean when I speak of tragedy is principally that Russell’s life seems to have been inexorably drawn towards disaster, determined on its course by two fundamental traits of character: a deep-seated fear of madness and a quite colossal vanity…He was, it sometimes seems, simply not capable of loving another human being.  Russell had what he considered to be an exalted conception of love — which he expressed in Marriage and Morals and in numerous other places — according to which love takes the form of ‘merging’ one ego with another.  In many of his political writings this notion reappears as the duty to love humanity in the sense of regarding all humanity as, in some sense, coextensive with one’s ego.  One might regard this as a harmlessly fanciful way of urging people to empathise with each other, but Russell’s relations with those close to him suggest another interpretation: that he was unable to conceive of loving another person unless he could regard that person as part of himself.  In other words, loving another was, for him, inconceivable. He was, as it were (as, indeed, his epistemology maintains we all are), trapped inside the boundaries of his own ego. He could imagine — and frequently did imagine — extending those boundaries, but what he could not imagine doing was reaching out beyond them. Would that this was only a theoretical problem, but the experience of Russell’s wives, children and friends suggests that, on this point, theory and practice combined in the most devastating manner.

Ray Monk, Bertrand Russell: The Ghost of Madness: 1921-1970 (xi-xii)

Sensuality often hastens the growth of love so much that the roots remain weak and are easily torn up

October 14, 2009

Sensuality often hastens the growth of love so much that the roots remain weak and are easily torn up.

Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, 120

Works of charity do most powerfully remove prejudice

September 16, 2009

Experience hath fully proved that works of charity do most powerfully remove prejudice, and open the heart to words of piety. If men see that you are addicted to do good, they will the more easily believe that you are good, and that it is good which you persuade them to. When they see that you love them, and seek their good, they will the more easily trust you.

Richard Baxter, Reformed Pastor, p.152

He impoverishes himself out of love

September 10, 2009

(a Christian) impoverishes himself out of love, so that he is certain he may never overlook a brother in need, especially if he knows he can bear poverty better than his brother. He likewise considers the pain of another as his own pain. And if he suffers any hardship because of having given out of his own poverty, he does not complain.

Clement of Alexandria, A.D. 190, misc. bk.4, ch.7

Drug use and the search for meaning

September 9, 2009

Young people are free to conquer the world, and they don’t want it. Material prosperity has not made life meaningful. The hunger for love and real meaning are the forces behind the psychedelic revolution…The (drug) experience is as far removed from Reality as is a mirage from water…But the search is real enough.

Dr. Allan Cohen, one of the originators of the psychedelic movement, in Michael Green, Jesus Spells Freedom, p.36

We must only love God, and we must only hate ourselves.

September 4, 2009

We must only love God, and we must only hate ourselves. These two laws are enough to rule the whole Christian republic better than all political laws.

Pascal

“Love does no wrong to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.” Rom.13.10

Hating sin for the sinner’s sake

September 3, 2009

For a long time, C.S. Lewis reports, he could never understand the hairsplitting distinction of hating a person’s sin and hating the sinner. How could you hate what a man did, and not hate the man? Lewis says, ‘But years later it occurred to me that there was one man to whom I had been doing this all my life–namely myself. However much I might dislike my own cowardice or conceit or greed, I went on loving myself. There had never been the slightest difficulty about it. In fact the very reason why I hated the things is that I loved the man. Just because I loved myself, I was sorry to find that I was the sort of man who did those things.’ “

What’s So Amazing About Grace – Yancey, pp.280-281