Archive for the ‘money’ Category

We buy things we don’t need with money we don’t have to impress people we don’t like

April 2, 2013

We buy things we don’t need with money we don’t have to impress people we don’t like.

Dave Ramsey (The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness)

Adam Smith did not let his left hand know what the right was doing

August 21, 2012

Adam Smith, the father of laissez-faire economics, gave away substantial sums of his own money to less fortunate people, though he did so with such discretion that this fact was discovered only after his death, when his personal records were examined. Henry Thornton, one of the great monetary economists of the nineteenth century and a banker by trade, regularly gave away more than half his annual income before he got married and had a family to support-and he continued to give large donations to humanitarian causes afterwards, including the anti-slavery movement.

 

Sowell, Thomas, Basic Economics: A Citizen’s Guide to the Economy (Basic Books, 2004) p.359

Official aid is more likely to retard development than to promote it

August 21, 2012

Official aid is more likely to retard development than to promote it.

Professer Peter Bauer, LSE

Sowell, Thomas, Basic Economics: A Citizen’s Guide to the Economy (Basic Books, 2004) p.340

This is due to it going to governments directly whose officials can use it for their own political advantage etc. Not to mention that aid does not incentivise the growth of industries in poorer countries but can foster dependence. This is not to say money should never be given, but that we should be wise in our giving. Stated goals are not the same as actual consequences.

You never know when you’ll go

August 21, 2012

A news story some years ago told of a speculator who made a deal with an elderly woman who needed money. In exchange for her making him the heir to her house, he agreed to pay her a fixed sum every month as long as she lived. However, this one-to-one deal did not work out as planned because she lived far longer than anyone expected and the speculator died before she did. An insurance company not only has the advantage of large numbers, it has the further advantage that its existence is not limited to the human lifespan.

Sowell, Thomas, Basic Economics: A Citizen’s Guide to the Economy (Basic Books, 2004) p.205

those who gather up riches for themselves in his name slander him greatly since they use him to cloak their own greed and wantonness

December 23, 2011

Christ rejects the riches and pomp of this world. From this we conclude that those who gather up riches for themselves in his name slander him greatly since they use him to cloak their own greed and wantonness.

23rd Thesis

Zwingli, 67 Theses

I will give you anything you want except my money or my Chess set

April 12, 2011

Dear God,

If you give me Genie lamp like Alladdin, I will give you anything you want except my money or my Chess set.

– Raphael

Children’s Letters to God

when I die, I want you to take all my money and place it in the casket with me

October 4, 2010

There was a man who worked all of his life and saved all of his money. He was a real miser when it came to his money. He loved money more than just about anything, and just before he died, he said to his wife, “Now listen, when I die, I want you to take all my money and place it in the casket with me. I wanna take my money to the afterlife.” So he got his wife to promise him with all her heart that when he died, she would put all the money in the casket with him. Well, one day he died. He was stretched out in the casket, the wife was sitting there in black next to her closest friend. When they finished the ceremony, just before the undertakers got ready to close the casket, the wife said “Wait just a minute!” She had a shoe box with her, she came over with the box and placed it in the casket. Then the undertakers locked the casket down and rolled it away. Her friend said, “I hope you weren’t crazy enough to put all that money in the casket.” “Yes,” the wife said, “I promised. I’m a good Christian, I can’t lie. I promised him that I was going to put that money in that casket with him.” “You mean to tell me you put every cent of his money in the casket with him?” “I sure did. I got it all together, put it into my account and I wrote him a check.”

Lottery winners could face lifetime of misery

November 21, 2009

A married couple from Wales have scooped a share of a £91 million EuroMillions jackpot but a national newspaper asks – is it the worst thing that could have happened to them?

“We may not be as rich” as those who win the lottery “but there’s every chance we may live longer, happier lives as a result”, Julia Hartley-Brewer, a Sunday Express reporter wrote.

She cites a survey of 30 of the biggest jackpot winners and said it branded the lottery “Britain’s biggest marriage wrecker” when it found that a third of respondents said their lives had been blighted by their new found fortune.

Families had fallen apart, marriages had ended and envy had destroyed friendships, the survey reportedly revealed.

The comments follow a spate of real life stories from lottery winners who have admitted misery because of their windfall.

Earlier this year Callie Rogers, 22, who won close to £1.9 million as a teenager in 2003, revealed that she is now facing bankruptcy and the money she won hasn’t made her happy.

She is currently holding down three jobs to support her two young children and she told a reporter that her life was now a “shambles”.

In 2005, after a suicide attempt, she said: “Until you win such a large amount of money at such a young age, you don’t realise the pressures that come with it.”

Michael Carroll, a former dustman, won £9.7million in 2002 but claimed it had made him miserable.

After he won the jackpot, his wife Sandra left him and took their baby daughter with her. Mr Carroll turned to cocaine, was jailed and was later served with two anti-social behaviour orders.

In 1999 Stephanie Powell won £7.2million, but her family life began to break down as a result.

Her partner Wayne Lawrence walked out on her, claiming the stress of her riches as his reason.

The article also cited research published this summer which warned that the lives of lottery winners could be cut short due to excessive alcohol-fuelled partying.

In 1999 Phil Kitchen, a jobless carpenter, won £1.8 million but two years later was found dead in his £500,000 home after drinking himself to death.

In July a report by the think-tank Theos argued that the National Lottery was penalising the poor.

Theos Director Paul Woolley said: “The Lottery might have created a new source of funding for projects that would otherwise have remained un-funded, but this has come with a high price tag for Britain’s poor.”

The report found that skilled manual workers are most likely to play in Lottery draws, with over 67 per cent taking part once a month compared with 47 per cent of professionals and managers.

According to the report, the average Lottery player spends £142.88 each year but among those with salaries of £15,000- £20,000 the figure increases to £174.53.

Christian Institute, Saturday, 21 November 2009

Still, sales of tickets will not go down. Everyone will say, ‘It could be me, but that wouldn’t happen to me.’

A few of the victims of Nazi death camps were extremely wealthy. One man had come into the camp with hat, gloves and well-cut overcoat. A few days later he was working at the crematorium refuse heap

November 17, 2009

A few of the victims of Nazi death camps were extremely wealthy. One man had come into the camp with hat, gloves and well-cut overcoat. A few days later he was working at the crematorium refuse heap. He, ‘who had looked like a diplomat, had become a dirty, lice-infested, human wreck, his spirits broken.

I saw him go over to one of the camp foremen and whisper (something). The prisoner…brought out a small leather pouch (and) shook the contents into his palm. Like a million little suns the diamonds shone and sparkled. The foreman nodded and held out three miserable uncooked potatoes, and the elderly man, shaking with impatience, tore them out of his hand and put them to his mouth.

Here, in this Stock Exchange of Hell, the value of a bag of diamonds was three uncooked potatoes. And this value was the real one. Three potatoes…prolonged life, gave strength to work and to withstand beatings. For a while, a short while, it might delight the eyes of a ruthless murderer, but when the day of reckoning came it would not save his life.

Martin Gilbert, Holocaust, p.729

What is the true value of our possessions? What is the use of acquiring the world’s goods when a man may lose his soul?

A blind love of one’s own property has deceived many. How could they be prepared for, or comfortable with, departing this earth when their wealth fetters them like a chain?

November 17, 2009

A blind love of one’s own property has deceived many. How could they be prepared for, or comfortable with, departing this earth when their wealth fetters them like a chain?….Therefore, the Lord, the teacher of all good things says, ‘If you will be perfect, go, sell all you have, and give to the poor, and you shall have treasure in heaven. And come and follow me’ (Matt 19:21) If rich men did this, they would not perish by their riches…..They think that they own, when actually it is they that are owned. They are not the lords of their money, but rather it’s slaves.’

Cyprian, On the Lapsed, secs. 11, 12 paraphrased

Cyprian had been a rich man but on conversion gave all is goods to the poor