Archive for the ‘noetic effects of sin’ Category

The evidence for the resurrection of Jesus, both Biblical and non-Biblical, factual and circumstantial, historical and experiential, is so convincing and so complete that no intelligent jury in the world could fail to bring in the verdict that Jesus rose from the dead

November 24, 2009

The evidence for the resurrection of Jesus, both Biblical and non-Biblical, factual and circumstantial, historical and experiential, is so convincing and so complete that no intelligent jury in the world could fail to bring in the verdict that Jesus rose from the dead, just as the Scriptures state and as Christians claim.

former Lord Chief Justice Darling

However, a biased jury would give the verdict that suited itself. Therefore the evidence alone is not decisive in any person’s verdict regarding the claims of Christ.

Aquinas’ unbiblical view of human reason

September 19, 2009

…some of (the heathen), like the Mohammedans and pagans, do not agree with us as to the authority of any Scripture whereby they may be convinced, in the same way as we are able to dispute with the Jews by means of the Old Testament, and with heretics by means of the New : whereas the former accept neither. Wherefore it is necessary to have recourse to natural reason, to which all are compelled to assent. And yet this is deficient in the things of God.

Thomas Aquinas, Summa Contra Gentiles, Book 1, ch.2

Aquinas had too rosy a view of the reasoning of fallen man. He thought natural reason, whilst unable to prove the Trinity, could prove the existence of one God. He failed to appreciate that man is totally depraved (in that every aspect of his nature, including his reason) is affected by the Fall. The Muslim, the pagan and the atheist will not, by and large, accept Aquinas’ reasons since they do not accord with their beliefs.

Strange as it may seem, we proclaim Christ from the Scripture to the Muslim and show him the very words of Jesus from the pages of the New Testament. This has a most powerful effect – more so than our puny reasonings.

Ephesians 4

Hebrews 4.12

There can be nothing so absurd, but may be found in the books of philosophers

September 16, 2009

For it is most true that Cicero saith of them somewhere; that there can be nothing so absurd, but may be found in the books of philosophers.

Thomas Hobbes

This is what Hobbes calls in man:

…the privilege of absurdity, to which no living creature is subject, but men only. And of men, those are of all most subject to it that profess philosophy.

Leviathan, ch. 5

Claiming to be wise, they became fools… Romans. 1.22

It is an inclination to evil

September 12, 2009

(Original sin) …is a complete deprivation of all rectitude and of the ability of all the powers of the body as well as the soul and of the entire inner and outer man. In addition to this, it is an inclination to evil, a disgust at the good, a disinclination toward light and wisdom; it is love of error and darkness, the avoidance of and supreme contempt for good works, a running to what is evil.

Martin Luther, What Luther Says: An Anthology, ed. E.M.Plass, 3 vols, Concordia, 1959, 3:1300-1

why has he such a passionate love for destruction and chaos also?

September 7, 2009

…tell me, who was it first announced, who was it first proclaimed, that man only does nasty things because he does not know his own interests; and that if he were enlightened, if his eyes were opened to his real normal interests, man would at once cease to do nasty things, would at once become good and noble because, being enlightened and understanding his real advantage, he would see his own advantage in the good and nothing else, and we all know that not one man can, consciously, act against his own interests, consequently, so to say, through necessity, he would begin doing good? Oh, the babe! Oh, the pure, innocent child! Why, in the first place, when in all these thousands of years has there been a time when man has acted only from his own interest? What is to be done with the millions of facts that bear witness that men, CONSCIOUSLY, that is fully understanding their real interests, have left them in the background and have rushed headlong on another path, to meet peril and danger, compelled to this course by nobody and by nothing, but, as it were, simply disliking the beaten track, and have obstinately, wilfully, struck out another difficult, absurd way, seeking it almost in the darkness.

Dostoevsky, Notes from the Underground, Part 1, VII

Man likes to make roads and to create, that is a fact beyond dispute. But why has he such a passionate love for destruction and chaos also? Tell me that.

IX

The Irrational Within

September 7, 2009

I, for instance, would not be in the least surprised if all of a sudden, a propos of nothing, in the midst of general prosperity a gentleman with an ignoble, or rather with a reactionary and ironical, countenance were to arise and, putting his arms akimbo, say to us all: ‘I say, gentleman, hadn’t we better kick over the whole show and scatter rationalism to the winds, simply to send these logarithms to the devil, and to enable us to live once more at our own sweet foolish will!’ That again would not matter, but what is annoying is that he would be sure to find followers – such is the nature of man. And all that for the most foolish reason, which, one would think, was hardly worth mentioning: that is, that man everywhere and at all times, whoever he may be, has preferred to act as he chose and not in the least as his reason and advantage dictated.

Dostoevsky, Notes from Underground, Part 1, Chapter VII

This would seem almost to be a prophesy of Hitler and/or Stalin

men are bundles of passions and instincts

September 1, 2009

If men were rational…intelligence would be enough to make the world almost a paradise. but men are bundles of passions and instincts. it is of the greatest importance to inquire whether any method of strengthening kindly impulses exists….Men’s collective passions are mainly evil; far the strongest of them are hatred and rivalry directed towards other groups.

Bertrand Russell, in Ray Monk, vol.2, p.29

Man: the unreason within

September 1, 2009

…modern psychology has dived much deeper into the ocean of insanity upon which the little barque of human reason insecurely floats. The intellectual optimism of a bygone age is no longer possible to the modern student of human nature. Yet it lingers in Marxism, making Marxians rigid and procrustean in their treatment of the instinct.

Bertrand Russell, Ray Monk, vol.1., p.587