Archive for the ‘John Locke’ Category

there is nothing that cannot be understood, that there is nothing that cannot be explained, and that everything is extraordinarily simple

October 11, 2009

The (atheist) scientist, Peter Atkins, in his book ‘The Creation’, claims that, ‘there is nothing that cannot be understood, that there is nothing that cannot be explained, and that everything is extraordinarily simple.’

His assertion is, in reality, a faith, a belief that the simplicity we require really is in the world. Why should the world be simple? Who made that decision? Who imposed it? There is no answer, for nowhere can we find any such guarantee. The leap from effectiveness to truth is a leap of faith. The reality of Atkins’ assertion is that it is a statement of this faith. And its passion arises from the way his faith has been tested by the revelations of 20th C. science, most vividly of quantum and chaos theory. For these revelations are, at heart, revelations of complexity.

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There is more wisdom in Locke’s observation:

We cannot fathom the mystery of a single flower. Nor is it intended that we should.

John Locke

The visible marks of extraordinary wisdom and power appear so plainly in all the works of the creation that a rational creature, who will but seriously reflect on them, cannot miss the discovery of Deity

October 10, 2009

The visible marks of extraordinary wisdom and power appear so plainly in all the works of the creation that a rational creature, who will but seriously reflect on them, cannot miss the discovery of Deity.

John Locke, from “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding”, 1690