Archive for the ‘Revival’ Category

Cessationism must account for the Supernatural work of the Spirit

December 17, 2013

Douglas Brown (Baptist minister under whose preaching the Revival at Lowestoft in 1921 came) was staying at the (Oulton) Rectory during this week of meetings and in the early hours of Thursday morning he was awakened by a voice saying. ‘Thou shalt see greater things than these.’ (John 14:12) He slipped quietly down to the study to pray and soon the door opened and the Rector appeared. He too had been awakened and had received the same message from John’s Gospel1.

 

1Stanley C Griffin, A Forgotten Revival: Recollections of the great Revivals of East Anglia and North East Scotland of 1921 (DayOne Publications: 2000)

The Lowestoft Revival of 1921 was indisputably a genuine work of the Holy Spirit. Surely a cessationist cannot dismiss such supernatural workings of the Spirit but must accommodate them within his theology of the Spirit.

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Wherever these flaming messengers of Jesus Christ came, they disturbed the false peace of the lukewarm, awakened the conscience of the sleeping sinner, and gave him no rest until he surrendered his heart to Christ

January 12, 2010

The preachers of the Great Awakening were described in this manner:

It was, indeed, this very devotion, this diligence, these zealous efforts in the cause of their divine Master, which provoked much of the opposition which they had to encounter. The lukewarm clergy were aroused to indignation at seeing themselves rivaled by those whom they affected to despise on account of their erratic habits and inferiority in point of literature and science. And as these zealous itinerants made their pointed appeals to the consciences of sinners, denounced the just judgments of God upon hardened offenders, their ire was often kindled against those who thus “reproved them in the gate.” Wherever these flaming messengers of Jesus Christ came, they disturbed the false peace of the lukewarm, awakened the conscience of the sleeping sinner, and gave him no rest until he surrendered his heart to Christ. They not only “preached in the great congregation” “in the city full,” but “into whatever house they entered,” they addressed themselves personally to its inmates, urging them to be “reconciled to God;” and they accompanied all their efforts by earnest prayer, both public and private, that God would sanction their labors by sending upon them the energies of the Holy Spirit.

Nathan Bangs, source

The policemen tell me that the public houses are nearly empty, the streets are quiet and swearing is rarely heared. Even old quarrels were ended begun by the Penrhyn quarry strike

October 3, 2009

In Bethseda, December 20th 1904, one minister said, The policemen tell me that the public houses are nearly empty, the streets are quiet and swearing is rarely heared. Even old quarrels were ended begun by the Penrhyn quarry strike.

David Lloyd George, in extolling the effects of the (Welsh) revival (1904-5), compared it to a tornado sweeping over the country and bringing in its train far-reaching national and social changes.

E.Evans, Welsh Revival of 1904, pp.110, 114, 115

Bookshops complained of the inadequacy of their supply of Bibles. The coal miners were transformed by the sound of praise in the place of blasphemous oaths. The public houses were empty of rowdy customers and the homes were full of joy and singing. The pit ponies wouldn’t respond to the miners’ commands so accustomed were they to the orders being associated with blasphemous oaths.

ibid., p.105

Evangelism – being charged with extremism (enthusiasm)

August 6, 2009

Because I am in earnest,” (Rowland Hill) once said at Wot-
ton, “men call me an enthusiast. But I am not;
mine are the words of truth and soberness. “When I
first came into this part of the country, I was walking
on yonder hill ; I saw a gravel-pit fall in, and bury three
human beings alive. I lifted up my voice for help
so loud that I was heard in the town below, at a dis-
tance of a mile ; help came, and rescued two of the
poor sufferers. No one called me an enthusiast then ;
and when I see eternal destruction ready to fall upon
poor sinners, and about to entomb them irrecoverably
in an eternal mass of woe, and call aloud on them to
escape, shall I be called an enthusiast now ? No,
sinner, I am not an enthusiast in so doing : I call
on thee aloud to fly for refuge to the hope set before
thee in the gospel of Christ Jesus ;”

LADY HUNTINGTON AND HER FRIENDS;
OR, THE REVIVAL OF THE WORK OF GOD IN THE DAYS OF WESLEY, WHITEPIELD, ROMAINE, VENN, AND OTHERS THE LAST CENTURY.
COMPILED BY MRS. HELEN C. KNIGHT. PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,
, NEW YORK.
1966 p.252-253