Archive for the ‘self-worship’ Category

Russell’s life seems to have been inexorably drawn towards disaster, determined on its course by two fundamental traits of character: a deep-seated fear of madness and a quite colossal vanity

November 15, 2009

Ray Monk spent more than 10 years on his two volume biography of Bertrand Russell. He comments:

Another reason – perhaps the main one – that this has been a difficult book to write has been my growing realisation of the tragedy of Russell’s life . . .I do not just mean that there was sadness in Russell’s life, though, to be sure, the degree of suffering he endured – and caused – has been one of the hardest revelations of my work on this book…what I mean when I speak of tragedy is principally that Russell’s life seems to have been inexorably drawn towards disaster, determined on its course by two fundamental traits of character: a deep-seated fear of madness and a quite colossal vanity…He was, it sometimes seems, simply not capable of loving another human being.  Russell had what he considered to be an exalted conception of love — which he expressed in Marriage and Morals and in numerous other places — according to which love takes the form of ‘merging’ one ego with another.  In many of his political writings this notion reappears as the duty to love humanity in the sense of regarding all humanity as, in some sense, coextensive with one’s ego.  One might regard this as a harmlessly fanciful way of urging people to empathise with each other, but Russell’s relations with those close to him suggest another interpretation: that he was unable to conceive of loving another person unless he could regard that person as part of himself.  In other words, loving another was, for him, inconceivable. He was, as it were (as, indeed, his epistemology maintains we all are), trapped inside the boundaries of his own ego. He could imagine — and frequently did imagine — extending those boundaries, but what he could not imagine doing was reaching out beyond them. Would that this was only a theoretical problem, but the experience of Russell’s wives, children and friends suggests that, on this point, theory and practice combined in the most devastating manner.

Ray Monk, Bertrand Russell: The Ghost of Madness: 1921-1970 (xi-xii)

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The Most Important Person in the whole wide world is YOU

October 13, 2009

The Most Important Person in the whole wide world
is YOU and you hardly even know you. The most important person in the whole wide world is YOU c’mon we’ll show you. . .

Captain Kangaroo (Children’s TV) aired on CBS

This is what the kids are taught. Then once the lesson is learned, you get this:

Do what feels good for you. “The most important person in the whole world is YOU.” I heard that ditty on some Saturday morning cartoon thing when i was a kid and it’s stuck in my head.

I have had to learn hard lessons about looking out for No. 1 in my own life and so now, to help me stay focused on not worrying about everyone else so much, i keep these words on my cell phone when i open it up: “Be Good To You.”

Advice given on a blog

We can be what we want to be.

Billy Bragg, Sexuality

This is our narcissistic day and age

The New god of Atheism

September 9, 2009

Prometheus’ confession ‘in a word, I hate all gods’, is its own confession, its own motto against all gods in heaven and earth who do not recognize man’s self-consciousness as the highest divinity.

Marx, from the preface to his PHD thesis,

Lyon, David. Karl Marx: A Christian Assessment of His Life & Thought. Herts: Lion, 1979. p.37

There must always be a god, an ultimate.

Our Narcissistic Culture

August 17, 2009

Believe in yourself

Adidas Commercial, Feb. 1998