Archive for the ‘sexual immorality’ Category

He that but looketh on a plate of ham and eggs to lust after it hath already committed breakfast with it in his heart

February 14, 2014

He that but looketh on a plate of ham and eggs to lust after it hath already committed breakfast with it in his heart.

C.S.Lewis

At what point have I committed breakfast? When I enter the supermarket? When I go down isle 2? Or when I look longingly at the sausages?

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Russell’s life seems to have been inexorably drawn towards disaster, determined on its course by two fundamental traits of character: a deep-seated fear of madness and a quite colossal vanity

November 15, 2009

Ray Monk spent more than 10 years on his two volume biography of Bertrand Russell. He comments:

Another reason – perhaps the main one – that this has been a difficult book to write has been my growing realisation of the tragedy of Russell’s life . . .I do not just mean that there was sadness in Russell’s life, though, to be sure, the degree of suffering he endured – and caused – has been one of the hardest revelations of my work on this book…what I mean when I speak of tragedy is principally that Russell’s life seems to have been inexorably drawn towards disaster, determined on its course by two fundamental traits of character: a deep-seated fear of madness and a quite colossal vanity…He was, it sometimes seems, simply not capable of loving another human being.  Russell had what he considered to be an exalted conception of love — which he expressed in Marriage and Morals and in numerous other places — according to which love takes the form of ‘merging’ one ego with another.  In many of his political writings this notion reappears as the duty to love humanity in the sense of regarding all humanity as, in some sense, coextensive with one’s ego.  One might regard this as a harmlessly fanciful way of urging people to empathise with each other, but Russell’s relations with those close to him suggest another interpretation: that he was unable to conceive of loving another person unless he could regard that person as part of himself.  In other words, loving another was, for him, inconceivable. He was, as it were (as, indeed, his epistemology maintains we all are), trapped inside the boundaries of his own ego. He could imagine — and frequently did imagine — extending those boundaries, but what he could not imagine doing was reaching out beyond them. Would that this was only a theoretical problem, but the experience of Russell’s wives, children and friends suggests that, on this point, theory and practice combined in the most devastating manner.

Ray Monk, Bertrand Russell: The Ghost of Madness: 1921-1970 (xi-xii)

Sex contains all, Bodies, Souls, meanings, proofs, purities, delicacies, results, promulgations, Songs, commands, health, pride, the maternal mystery, the seminal milk

October 14, 2009

Sex contains all,
Bodies, Souls, meanings, proofs, purities, delicacies, results, promulgations,
Songs, commands, health, pride, the maternal mystery, the seminal milk;
All hopes, benefactions, bestowals,
All the passions, loves, beauties, delights of the earth,
All the governments, judges, gods, follow’d persons of the earth,
These are contain’d in sex, as parts of itself, and justifications of itself.

Walt Whitman, A WOMAN waits for me

Sex as idol?

corruptio optimi pessima – the best, when corrupted, becomes the worst

Sensuality often hastens the growth of love so much that the roots remain weak and are easily torn up

October 14, 2009

Sensuality often hastens the growth of love so much that the roots remain weak and are easily torn up.

Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, 120

I can’t justify it, but it was a deep and sincere prayer – a prayer for strength to subdue my instincts

October 13, 2009

Despite being a critic of religion,  Bertrand Russell’s biographer, Ray Monk, writes that he once prayed on his knees to God in the San Zeno Maggiore, Verona. He was struggling to control his sexual passions. Russell wrote:

I can’t justify it, but it was a deep and sincere prayer – a prayer for strength to subdue my instincts.

Clearly his rationalism wasn’t of much help at that time.

The Most Important Person in the whole wide world is YOU

October 13, 2009

The Most Important Person in the whole wide world
is YOU and you hardly even know you. The most important person in the whole wide world is YOU c’mon we’ll show you. . .

Captain Kangaroo (Children’s TV) aired on CBS

This is what the kids are taught. Then once the lesson is learned, you get this:

Do what feels good for you. “The most important person in the whole world is YOU.” I heard that ditty on some Saturday morning cartoon thing when i was a kid and it’s stuck in my head.

I have had to learn hard lessons about looking out for No. 1 in my own life and so now, to help me stay focused on not worrying about everyone else so much, i keep these words on my cell phone when i open it up: “Be Good To You.”

Advice given on a blog

We can be what we want to be.

Billy Bragg, Sexuality

This is our narcissistic day and age

Those who indulge in perversion tell those who are living normal lives that it is they who are deviating from what is natural

September 26, 2009

Those who indulge in perversion tell those who are living normal lives that it is they who are deviating from what is natural. They think they are following a natural life themselves. They are like people on a ship who think it is those on shore who are moving away. Language is relative everywhere. But we need a fixed point for those who are moving aboard ship. But in morality, where are we going to find a harbor?

Pascal

The life to come is more sweet, and the death to come is more bitter

September 26, 2009

(On John Hooper’s last night before martyrdom under Bloody Mary) Sir Anthony Kingston, whom he had once offended by rebuking his sins, came to see him, and entreated him, with much affection and many tears, to consult his safety and recant. ” Consider,” he said, ” that life is sweet, and death is bitter. Life hereafter may do good.” To this the noble soldier of Christ returned the ever memorable answer :  “The life to come is more sweet, and the death to come is more bitter.” Seeing him immovable, Kingston left him with bitter tears, telling him, ” I thank God that ever I knew you, seeing God did appoint you to call me to be His child. By your good instruction, when I was before a fornicator and adulterer, God hath taught me to detest and forsake the same.” Hooper afterwards said that this interview had drawn from him more tears than he had shed throughout the seventeen months of his imprisonment.

J.C. Ryle, Five English Reformers, Banner of Truth, 1994, p.55

Civilization needs personal restraint

September 14, 2009

Mankind has known intuitively for at least 50 centuries that indiscriminate sexual activity represents both an individual and a corporate threat to survival. And history bears it out. Anthropologist J.D. Unwin conducted an exhaustive study of the 88 civilizations which have existed in the history of the world. Each culture has reflected a similar life cycle, beginning with a strict code of sexual conduct and ending with the demand for complete ‘freedom’ to express individual passion. Unwin reports that every society which extended sexual permissiveness to its people was soon to perish. There have been no exceptions.

James Dobson

God’s Laws Inconvenience Our Chosen Lifestyle

September 4, 2009

Most people I’ve represented, if they were aware of the 10 Commandments, would have chosen to ignore them, because it spoils the things they most enjoy in life.

Max Clifford, publisher

(on the Commandments)

You’ve got to rewrite it – it’s a flawed product.

John Hegarty, Creative Director, BBH Advertising

The flaw, though, is in us. “the law is holy, and the commandment is holy and righteous and good.” Rom.7.12