Archive for the ‘Solzhenitsyn’ Category

26.3 million Chinese were killed during the regime of Mao Tse Tung betwen the years of 1949 and May 1965

October 11, 2009

26.3 million Chinese were killed during the regime of Mao Tse Tung betwen the years of 1949 and May 1965. the Walker Report published by the U.S. Senate Committee of the Judiciary in July 1971 which ‘placed the parameters of the total death toll within China since 1949 between 32.25 and 61.7 million’.

In the USSR, according to Guinness, ‘Nobel Prize winner Alexander Solzhenitsyn estimated the loss of life from state repression and terrorism from October 1917 to December 1959 under Lenin, Stalin and Khrushchev at 66,700,000.’

The worst genocide as a percentage of a nation’s total population happened in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge. According to Guinness, ‘More than one third of the 8 million Khmers were killed between 17 Apr 1975 and January 1979.’

During that time towns, money and property were abolished. Economic execution by bayonet and club was introduced for such offenses as falling asleep during the day, asking too many questions, playing non-communist music, being old and feeble, being the offspring of an undesirable, or being too well educated. In fact, deaths in the Tuol Sleng interrogation center in Phnom Penh, which is the capital of Kampuchea, reached 582 in a day.

Gregory Koukl (from The Guinness Book of World Records)

http://www.str.org

Advertisements

Atheism – Consequences

July 14, 2009

More than half a century ago, while I was still a child, I recall hearing a number of older people offer the following explanation for the great disasters that had befallen Russia: Men have forgotten God; that’s why all this has happened.

Since then I have spent well-nigh fifty years working on the history of our Revolution; in the process I have read hundreds of books, collected hundreds of personal testimonies, and have already contributed eight volumes of my own toward the effort of clearing away the rubble left by that upheaval. But if I were asked today to formulate as concisely as possible the main cause of the ruinous Revolution that swallowed up some sixty million of our people, I could not put it more accurately than to repeat: Men have forgotten God; that’s why all this has happened.

What is more, the events of the Russian Revolution can only be understood now, at the end of the century, against the background of what has since occurred in the rest of the world. What emerges here is a process of universal significance. And if I were called upon to identify briefly the principal trait of the entire twentieth century, here too, I would be unable to find anything more precise and pithy than to repeat once again: Men have forgotten God.

Solzhenitsyn, The Templeon Address, 1983