Archive for the ‘purpose of suffering’ Category

God permits what he hates to achieve what he loves

November 11, 2011

God permits what he hates to achieve what he loves.

Joni Eareckson Tada

 

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He was never made wiser by his sufferings

September 8, 2011

By imputing none of his miseries to himself, he continued to act upon the same principles, and to follow the same path; was never made wiser by his sufferings, nor preserved by one misfortune from falling into another. He proceeded throughout his life to tread the same steps on the same circle; always applauding his past conduct, or at least forgetting it, to amuse himself with phantoms of happiness, which were dancing before him; and willingly turned his eyes from the light of reason, when it would have discovered the illusion, and shown him, what he never wished to see, his real state.

Johnson’s Lives of the Poets — Volume 1, on the poet Savage

We are supposed to learn from suffering but we may merely live in the illusion that we are incapable of folly or evil.

Ill to him is no ill, but only good in a mysterious form

November 21, 2010

It is impossible that any ill should happen to the man who is beloved of the Lord; the most crushing calamities can only shorten his journey and hasten him to his reward. Ill to him is no ill, but only good in a mysterious form. Losses enrich him, sickness is his medicine, reproach is his honour, death is his gain. No evil in the strict sense of the word can happen to him, for everything is overruled for good. Happy is he who is in such a case. He is secure where others are in peril, he lives where others die.

Charles Spurgeon

the greatest earthly blessing that God can give to any of us is health, with the exception of sickness

February 6, 2010

‘In the matter of faith-healing, health is set before us as if it were the great thing to be desired above all other things. Is it so? I venture to say that the greatest earthly blessing that God can give to any of us is health, with the exception of sickness. Sickness has frequently been of more use to the saints of God than health has. . . . A sick wife, a newly-made grave, poverty, slander, sinking of spirit, might teach us lessons nowhere else to be learned so well. Trials drive us to the realities of religion.’

Spurgeon