Archive for the ‘Vinoth Ramachandra’ Category

Whoever boast of being ‘tolerant’ towards other beliefs while, at the same time, asserting that such beliefs are fundamentally no different to any other set of beliefs or that, even if they were, they do not make any decisive difference to a person’s life now or ever, is simply emptying the word tolerance of any moral value

November 11, 2009

Whoever boast of being ‘tolerant’ towards other beliefs while, at the same time, asserting that such beliefs are fundamentally no different to any other set of beliefs or that, even if they were, they do not make any decisive difference to a person’s life now or ever, is simply emptying the word tolerance of any moral value. At worst, it is simply a narcissistic endorsement of one’s own worldview.

Vinoth Ramachandra, The Recovery of Mission, p.271

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If our self-identity is rooted in anything we possess, whether it be our racial or cultural heritage, educational ability, theological scholarship, wealth, social prestige, religious devotion, ‘meritorious works’, political power, moral achievments, or whatever, that identity will always divide us from others who lack that particular possession

October 13, 2009

If our self-identity is rooted in anything we possess, whether it be our racial or cultural heritage, educational ability, theological scholarship, wealth, social prestige, religious devotion, ‘meritorious works’, political power, moral achievments, or whatever, that identity will always divide us from others who lack that particular possession. Language, Culture, Religion, Education, Science…all these, while either neutral or good in themselves, become causes of human division whenever they are sources of human identity. And they become sources of human identity when we reject the identity God confers on us. The attempt to ‘make ourselves’ through what we do, in whatever area of human action, stands in contradiction to divine grace.

Vinoth Ramachandra, The Recovery of Mission pp.266-7

Hick’s neo-Kantian paradigm

September 17, 2009

for Kant God is postulated, not experienced. In partial agreement but also partial disagreement with him, I want to say that the Real an sich is postulated by us as a presupposition, not of the moral life [as in Kant], but of religious experience and the religious life, whilst the gods, as also the mystically known Brahman, Sunyara and so on, are phenomenal manifestations of the Real occurring within the realm of religious experience.

all that we are entitled to say about the noumenal source of this information is that it is the reality whose influence produces, in collaboration with the human mind, the phenomenal world of our [religious] experience.

John Hick, (1989) An Interpretation of Religion: Human Responses to the Transcendent. New Haven: Yale University Press., 243

Vinoth Ramachandra comments:

But in Kantian thought the phenomenal realm is the same for each of us in as much as our minds use the ame categories to interpret the noumenal input…and how does he know, ‘all we are entitled to say’ and no moer? How does he know there is a connection between the phenomenal religious experience and the noumenal realm?

See, Ramachandra, Recovery of Mission, p.121

My comment: perhaps the guru isn’t in touch with God but had bad fish, or marijuana.

The Seeing Narrator among the blind men and the elephant

September 17, 2009

You’ve probably heard of the story of the blind men and the elephant to explain the diversity of religious viewpoints as merely perspectives. No one religion is ultimately true but are culture-bound. Vinoth Ramachandra comments on this common opinion:

It is the narrator (who) alone has access to the true nature of Reality. From his lofty vantage point he can see that the reports of the blind men are clumsy images that need to be complimented by other reports. So what passes for a posture of intellectual humility before the variety of religious truth claims is, in fact, a posture of intellectual imperialism.

Vinoth Ramachandra, Recovery of Mission, pp.120-121, 125