Archive for the ‘William Tyndale’ Category

as touching to please God, there is no work better than another…whether thou be an apostle or a shoemaker…thou art a kitchen page and washest thy master’s dishes, another is an Apostle and preacheth the Word of God

November 15, 2009

…as touching to please God, there is no work better than another…whether thou be an apostle or a shoemaker…thou art a kitchen page and washest thy master’s dishes, another is an Apostle and preacheth the Word of God. …Now if thou compare deed to deed there is difference betwixt washing of dishes and preaching of the Word of God. But as touching to please God none at all.

William Tyndale, Daniel D William, Tyndale, Yale U P 1994, New Haven and London p167/8.

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By faith are we saved only, in believing the promises. And though faith be never without love and good works, yet is our saving imputed neither to love nor unto good works, but unto faith only

October 31, 2009

By faith are we saved only, in believing the promises. And though faith be never without love and good works, yet is our  saving imputed neither to love nor unto good works, but unto faith only. For love and works are under the law, which requireth perfection and the ground and fountain of the heart, and damneth all imperfectness. Now is faith under the promises, which damn not; but give pardon, grace, mercy, favor, and whatsoever is contained in the promises.

William Tyndale, A PATHWAY INTO THE HOLY SCRIPTURE,

True preaching is salting

September 19, 2009

Some will say a man might preach long enough without persecution, yea, and get favour too, if he would not meddle with the pope, bishops, prelates, and holy ghostly people that live in contemplation and solitariness, nor with great men of the world. I answer, true preaching is salting ; and all that is corrupt must be salted : and those persons are of all other most corrupt, and therefore may not be left untouched. The pope’s pardons must be rebuked ; the abuse of the mass, of the sacraments, and of all the ceremonies must be rebuked and salted. And selling of merits, and of prayers, must be salted. The abuse of fasting and of pilgrimage must be salted. All idolatry and false faith must be rebuked. And those friars that teach men to believe in St Francis’ coat, how that they shall never come in hell or purgatory, if they be buried therein, may not be passed over with silence.

William Tyndale, in David Daniell, 1994, p.221 – online

Expound the Law truly

September 19, 2009

Expound the Law truly and open the veil of Moses to condemn all flesh and prove all men sinners, and set at broach the mercy of our Lord Jesus, and let wounded consciences drink of Him…All doctrine that casteth a mist on these two to shadow and hide them, resist with all your power.

William Tyndale to John Fryth. Source

Why should we avoid whatever ‘casteth a mist on these two’? Because to avoid the one makes Christ’s death meaningless and leaves men smug in self-righteousness; to avoid the other leaves them in despair or, smug legalists.

More on preaching the law first here

Tyndale suffered shipwreck and lost all his books

September 15, 2009

On ‘the coast of Holland, (Tyndale) suffered shipwreck, by the which he lost all his Books, Writings, and Copies, and so was compelled to begin all again anew, to his hinderance, and doubling of his labors.

David Daniell, William Tyndale, Yale, 1994, p.198 from Foxe, 1570 ed. between 1528-30

Yet he went on to complete his translation of the Pentateuch from March 1529- Dec. 1529

The Gospel Defined – Tyndale

August 27, 2009

Evangelion (that we call the gospel) is a Greek word and signifieth good, merry, glad and joyful tidings, that maketh a man’s heart glad and maketh him sing, dance, and leap for joy… [This gospel is] all of Christ the right David, how that he hath fought with sin, with death, and the devil, and overcome them: whereby all men that were in bondage to sin, wounded with death, overcome of the devil are without their own merits or deservings loosed, justified, restored to life and saved, brought to liberty and reconciled unto the favor of God and set at one with him again: which tidings as many as believe laud, praise and thank God, are glad, sing and dance for joy.

– William Tyndale, A Pathway into the Holy Scripture, 1531

Faith and Works

May 28, 2009

It is faith alone that saves us, but not a bare faith. When a horse beareth a saddle and a man thereon, we may well say that the horse only and alone beareth the saddle, but we do not mean the saddle empty, and no man thereon.

William Tyndale

The Reformation In England, By J. H. Merle D’Aubigné
(Originally published in 1866)
Reprint by Banner of Truth Trust
1962 (first edition). p.396

Antichrist – Tyndale

May 28, 2009

(Tyndale) had just published the Obedience of a Christian Man, and the Parable of the Wicked Mammon, in which he represented Rome as one of the transformations of Antichrist. “Antichrist,” said he in the latter treatise, “is not a man that should suddenly appear with wonders; he is a spiritual thing, who was in the Old Testament and also in the time of Christ and the apostles, and is now and shall (I doubt not) endure till the world’s end. His nature is (when he is overcome with the Word of God) to go out of the play for a season, and to disguise himself, and then to come in again with a new name and new raiment. The Scribes and Pharisees in the gospel were very Antichrists; popes, cardinals, and bishops have gotten their new names, but the thing is all one. Even so now, when we have uttered [vanquished] him, he will change himself once more, and turn himself into an angel of light. Already the beast, seeing himself now to be sought for, roareth and seeketh new holes to hide himself in, and changeth himself into a thousand fashions with all manner of wiliness, falsehood, subtlety, and craft.”
The Reformation In England, By J. H. Merle D’Aubigné
(Originally published in 1866)
Reprint by Banner of Truth Trust
1962 (first edition). p.311

Law and Gospel – William Tyndale

May 28, 2009

“The law and the gospel,” says a citizen of London, in his shop, “what is that?” “They are two keys,” answered Tyndale. “The law is the key which shuts up all men under condemnation, and the gospel is the key which opens the door and lets them out. Or, if you like it, they are two salves. The law, sharp and biting, driveth out the disease and killeth it; while the gospel, soothing and soft, softens the wound and brings life.”

The Reformation In England, By J. H. Merle D’Aubigné
(Originally published in 1866)
Reprint by Banner of Truth Trust
1962 (first edition). p.248

Cost of Discipleship

May 27, 2009

Tyndale, who witnessed this persecution, feared lest the stake should interrupt his labor. If those who read a few fragments of Scripture were threatened with death, what would he not have to endure who was translating the whole? His friends entreated him to withdraw from the bishop’s pursuit. “Alas!” he exclaimed, “is there then no place where I can translate the Bible? … It is not the bishop’s house alone that is closed against me, but all England.”

He then made a great sacrifice. Since there is no place in his own country where he can translate the Word of God, he will go and seek one among the nations of the continent. It is true the people are unknown to him; he is without resources; perhaps persecution and even death await him there. … It matters not! Some time must elapse before it is known what he is doing, and perhaps he will have been able to translate the Bible. He turned his eyes towards Germany. “God does not destine us to a quiet life here below,” he said. “If he calls us to peace on the part of Jesus Christ, he calls us to war on the part of the world.”

D’Aubigne, The Reformation in England, Vol. 1, p.197
Banner of Truth, first edition, 1962